The Journey Of Oscar's Immigration To Canada

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Oscar, saying goodbye to Hilda in Tallinn ferried to Sweden and boarded the ship Gripsholm in the port of Göteborg at the beginning of April, 1929 and set sail for the newly opened, and to become famous, Pier 21 of Halifax. On April 14, 1929 he officially became an immigrant to Canada and headed towards Winnipeg. The trip took 3 to 4 days via a locked wagon, sitting on wooden seats, for the 3300 km trip from Halifax to Winnipeg. Once there Oscar was placed in an immigrant barrack which was a distribution point for labour. Then he had to wait till a local farmer would arrive to choose him. There was talk about the type of boss one could get. It had to be hoped to get a farm owner who would take good care of the immigrant and pay the salaries. …show more content…
For him “the land seemed endless as the sea” and you could “not see the other end of the furrow.” It took, according to Oscar, the labour of 7 men to operate and maintain the homestead filled horizon to horizon of oats, barley and wheat. In addition to the crops it was also a cattle and hog ranch with about 500 pigs. Roaming threshers would be paid $11⁄2 a day to separate the grain from the chaff. Adding to the stage that was set just before Oscar arrived, the Feeleys, with neighbouring farmers, purchased 'Sunny Jim ', a Belgian stallion that was trucked around to the owners farms to breed as required. Also while on the Feeley farm Oscar, as many an Estonian immigrant, learnt as much English he could to better protect himself in his next and hopefully better …show more content…
One consequence of this was that they could afford to take in Oscar’s daughter Vaike (or Vicky). As she was still only 13, in 1936, and didn’t know much about Canada, Hilda went back over to Estonia on July 2 to bring her back and also take the opportunity to update herself with old friendships and relatives through the summer. The ship taking Hilda to and back from Europe, The Empress of Britain, was the largest, fastest and most luxurious ship between England and Canada at the time, indicating just how much the Tölpts had overcome their hard times although Hilda and Vaike travelled third class. (This ship 's fate was to be the largest liner to be sunk by a U-boat in WWII at the cost of 45 lives, 598 rescued). The two left Estonia for Hull England on a Finnish ship and then had to make their way down to Southampton to board The Empress there. There was a bit of a problem as the two were initially stricken from the list and later reinstated. It was a hint of what was to come in Canada. Vicky entered Canada with her step-mother in the second week of September of 1936 to become one of Canada’s latest immigrants. However again there was an incident. They entered Canada at Quebec City and just like all the other immigrants on their ship, were processed in the city’s famous Citadel (the 'Gibraltar of America ' originally built in the 18th century). Immigration officials there found that not all the paperwork for

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