The Jacksonian Period

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The changes during a reign as president, for better or worse, leave an impact on U.S. history. The greatest, or worst, of these reigns get their special names and place because of the actions done greatly affected the U.S. in some way. The Jacksonian Period was called the era of the “common man” and lived up to this through economic development, politics, and reform movements. The economic development during the Jacksonian period helped it live up to the title the era of the “common man.” In 1830 Jackson vetoed a congressional measure to a proposed road in Kentucky for he thought it was unconstitutional because it only laid in Kentucky and had nothing to do with “interstate commerce.” He also thought it was an unwise extravagant expenditure …show more content…
Voters went from just men who owned land or tax payers to all men, and all voters could now hold office. During Jackson’s reign as president parties had begun to form. The election of Jackson was the first to legitimize parties on the federal level. Anti-Jacksonians became known as Whigs and Jacksonians became the Democrats, giving the nation’s oldest party its everlasting name. The parties’ permanent opposition forced them to be sensitive to the will of the people. The Democrats gained support from small merchants, working men of the northeast, southern planters, and westerners, while Whigs relied on more substantial merchants. Whigs tended to from the wealthy and drew their support from the wealthy way more than Democrats. Jackson wanted to limit the government’s power while preserving the Union at the same time. Democrats as a whole believed that the federal government’s power should be limited until it reaches the degree that eliminated social and economic arrangements that entrenched privilege and stifled opportunity. Jacksonian Democrats celebrated “honest workers,” “simple farmers,” and “forthright businessmen.” Jackson practiced the “spoils system” and replaced some entrenched officeholders with his supporters. Jackson believed the government should provide …show more content…
from populations to industries. Rails had started replacing canals and allowing goods and people to get to places quicker than before. This caused people to live longer and the boom in industry created jobs for the “common man” to fill. This helped increase the want for territory in the West, which caused more conflict with the Indians that lived there. Attitudes towards the Indians had changed from Jefferson’s era, the white settlers no longer thought of them as “noble savages,” but just as savages that needed to be removed. During Jackson’s presidency the government moved Indians further and further off their lands. When John Marshall and the Supreme Court ruled that states didn’t have the right to negotiate with the tribes Jackson said “John Marshall has made his decision. Now let him enforce it.” In 1838, two years after Jackson left office, the “Trail of Tears” happed where 1,000s of Indians were forced to trek to now a day Oklahoma. The five main tribes were Cherokee, Creek, Seminole, Chickasaw, and Choctaw. Some Cherokee escaped to the Smoky Mountains where the government gave up and made a reservation. Some Seminoles in Florida escaped from soldiers by guerilla warfare and hiding in the everglades. By the end of the 1830s tribes had surrendered over 100 million acres and almost all

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