The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

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The Israeli-Palestinian conflict of 1947 is an on-going conflict between the two middle-eastern countries of Israel and Palestine. After the end of World War II, the Jewish people were displaced as were the Palestinians, but before World War II the Ottoman Empire devoured most of the land-now known as the Middle-East this land had been divided among the Islamic people who already inhabited the lands. The Jewish people had no place to go, having been dehumanized for centuries within Europe and everywhere else, the United Nation’s finally fulfilled a duty they set for themselves after World War I, which had been to set aside land for the Jewish and Palestinian people. Israel was once again reborn. “.... a UN partition plan mandated the creation …show more content…
Many Palestinians lived in what was now Israel, having made a live there, and becoming displaced and separated from their people as the Jewish began to settle in. While many countries began to form at the end of the Ottoman Empire, most groups were neglecting government set-up and were working on location, meanwhile the Jewish people immediately began to set up their own economy and government structure into place, as were the Palestinians. In 1948 land Palestinians lived on began to turn into Jewish land, having been incorporated into many Jewish laws to stabilize the Jewish State as an expansive piece of land, which is only as big as New Jersey. The tension built as Palestinians were losing land. They now only inhabited-in mass majority within-Palestine and Gaza. At this time, the rest of the Arab States began to focus themselves on Israel with their military forces, attacking from Jordan, Iraq and Egypt. The war involved is still incorporated into the overall conflict and destructiveness among the Arab and Jewish States of the Middle-East. Jordan lost the west bank to Israel as a result of their first attack. Egypt eventually switched leadership and accepted land as a peace treaty from Israel, however this was after another full scale attack in …show more content…
Another issue for this land is not simply the land but the borders around the land, and where the line is drawn between nations. The land given to the Jewish people had once been narrower before the Jewish government that had formed there began taking in land and using laws they’ve created to do so, as they believe they are in right to, “Both groups believe that they have a God-given right to the territory, and both claim rights based on the pact God made with Abraham in the Bible’s Old

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