History: The Iranian Revolution

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The Iranian revolution was conducted by the under classes of society against the government but mainly against the Shah, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi. Several policies were put into place by the Mohammad Reza Pahlavi himself and those policies angered Iran’s population. Even though actions were taken to calm the citizens it was too late to retain a firm grasp on power.
Before the Iranian revolution, Iran was a well-developed country economically because it is founded on oil rich land. Everyone in the world who had engines and other modern tools needed oil. Since there was a high demand Iran 's economy skyrocketed. Later on Iran would become the second largest economy in the Middle East (Iran in the World Today). During this time the United States
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Movements by people were common but because the Iran government was praised and backed by the U.S. they were able to dissolve the protests. It wasn 't until later when the strong leader Ayatollah Khomeini took hold and led the people who were trying to fight the government. Khomeini disliked the U.S. because they for the most part maintained Israel and that is where Muslims were being persecuted. It is thought that he believed that a war was going on between the Muslims and the Israelis and Americans and that is why he wanted to dissemble the American backed government (The Downfall of the American-Iranian Relations). Khomeini even stated, “America is the great Satan, the wounded snake.” His quote refers to the United States as evil and in a sense feels it is necessary to disconnect them for the daily life of Iranians (Ayatollah Khomeini). Believing that the government was corrupt Khomeini called for demonstrations that would later on become increasingly difficult to suppress and sometimes even impossible to control (The Downfall of the American-Iranian …show more content…
He fled the country to exile in fear that he would be prosecuted. Later on he went to the United States for medical treatment. Iran disapproved of the U.S. helping him and wanted the former Shah returned. Refusing because they needed to give him treatment, Iran took measures they considered normal but U.S. considered outrageous and unforgivable. Three hundred to five hundred students took 66 or so Americans hostages (The Iranian hostage crisis PBS). Later on the women and children were let go but 51 hostages were kept. It was only after 444 days that Iran and the U.S. consulted one another and successfully bargained for the release of the other prisoners (Iran hostage crisis U.S.

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