The Interesting Narrative Of The Life Of Fredrick Douglas, An American Slave

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Slave Narrative is a genre of literature that was either written by slaves themselves, or described by them to someone else who wrote their accounts for them. These narratives described the mental, psychological, emotional, and psychical mistreatment as a slave. In 1789, Olaudah Equiano published an autobiography titled “The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African”. Equiano’s narrative describes his life as a slave, his travels, and ultimately his life as a free man. One of the most well-known slave narratives was written by Fredrick Douglas. In 1845, Fredrick Douglas published his autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Fredrick Douglas, An American Slave. Douglas’ fascinating narrative allows us …show more content…
He offers evidence and examples of the mistreatment slaves faced in the South that allow for a deeper feeling of emotion. It seems as though Douglas’ specific qualities are less important than the comparison of his conditions to those of all other slaves. At times, Douglas exists merely as a witness, allowing others to place themselves in the position as a witness also. In “The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African”, Equiano, like Frederick Douglass, desired to establish himself as an honest, Christian, and trustworthy man. The first way he does this is by including letters and documentation in the beginning of the Narrative. Equiano included letters in his narrative which are important because they legitimize the text for his readers. He also discusses how important it is that he be taken seriously and honestly. The most interesting factor about Equiano is how he stresses his honesty for hopes his readers accept him and be more likely to hear his plea for …show more content…
In “Narrative of the Life of Fredrick Douglas, An American Slave”, Douglass shows how slaves are regularly distributed between masters, how slave owners valued only to the extent to which slave can perform manual labor, and often treated slaves like livestock. Douglas loathes this treatment of humans as objects or animals as cruel and inhumane and the religious justification. “I am filled with unutterable loathing when I contemplate the religious pomp and show, together with the horrible inconsistencies, which every where surround me. We have men‐stealers for ministers, womenwhippers for missionaries, and cradle‐ plunderers for church members” (Douglas, p. 65). He was disgusted with the current circumstance of the world and decided he would take a

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