Police Corruption In Thomas Grisham's The Innocent Man

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I thoroughly enjoyed The Innocent Man from start to finish. At times the story was slow but I liked the way Grisham dictated the reader’s emotions, making them feel for the characters, and keeping the reader’s attention throughout the story. One thing I disliked about the book was how Grisham presented the story, I did not like how the Haraway murder was thrown into the middle of the story and the reader was expected to follow both cases. With the amount of detail that Grisham gave, it was a little much to follow. I felt it was also unnecessary when he brought in new characters and stories of other death row inmates that really had nothing to do with the plot. That being said, I still enjoyed the story. It is a real eye opener; it makes the reader think twice about the American Justice System and how …show more content…
Overall, the entirety of the case and evidence was mainly the cause of police corruption, which I believe was the most shocking aspect of this book. However, there are improved technological advancements in law enforcement today that try to prevent innocent people, like Ron, from finding their way behind bars. Although it still happens, it is less likely for police and detectives to convict the wrong person. According to chapter 5 in the textbook, the new technological advancements include a new software called data mining which identifies crime patterns and links them to suspects, Enclosed Space Detection Systems (ESDS) which can determine if there’s a person in the trunk of a vehicle, thermal imagers, high-definition surveys (HDS) which creates a virtual crime scene and allows the investigators to see every detail, Crime mapping which locates the hot spots of crime, Biometrics which recognizes a person based on psychological or behavioral characteristics, Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems, new and improved DNA testing, surveillance cameras, and GPS tracking

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