Rosie The Riveter Picture Analysis

Great Essays
World War II currently still holds the title of the largest armed conflict in human history. It stretched between six different continents and it is estimated that were 50 million military and civilian deaths. The extent of the war was global, therefore producing a new world, both in the United States and overseas. With this new era came significant steps toward acquiring economic, political, and social rights for women. Because more men were enlisting in the war effort, the work force began to disparage and so began the influence of women in the workforce. Mothers, daughters, wives, secretaries and even children in school assembled to the factories to take on the jobs the men had left behind. Articles and advertisements began to be published …show more content…
government who was featured in a propaganda campaign that aimed at white middle class females to work and became the most iconic image of women in the workforce during the war. The “We Can Do It!” propaganda photograph, often referred to as the Rosie the Riveter picture is iconic in the transition of women into the paid industrial workforce during the second World War. The main character acted as an icon during the 1940s by representing wen in the wartime workforce. Today, Rosie is known as means of representing the feminist movement through both social and historical contexts for inequality. A freelance artist named J. Howard Miller created the advertisement in 1942 and was commissioned by the Westinghouse Electric Manufacturing Company. Rosie’s poster was part of a larger project that aimed to communicate an ideology of hard work, patriotism, and the belief that everyone had an important role to play in the war, despite their …show more content…
Howard Miller was hired to create a series of posters for the war effort in 1942 by the Westinghouse Company’s War Production Coordinating Committee. One of the posters created by Miller was the “We Can Do It!” image, which would later be known as Rosie the Riveter, but that was not his intention. He created the poster based on a United Press photograph taken of a factory worker from Michigan named Geraldine Doyle. The United Press photograph was by Norman Rockwell and was featured on the Saturday Evening Post. Miller’s image was solely meant to contribute in recruiting women to the workforce. When the poster was released, the name “Rosie” was not connected to it, the image had not really been seen outside of the Midwest Westinghouse factory where it was exhibited for two weeks in the month of February. It was not until the 1970s that Miller’s poster was rediscovered and only then became the prominent “Rosie the Riveter.” This image fits into Miller’s oeuvre because he had a series of these images. When the Westinghouse Company hired him, he was contracted to do a series of images with the same theme of trying to get women to apply. The majority of Miller’s other work is not as famous as his “We Can Do It!” image, but it could not have been as powerful as it was without Rockwell’s image as a

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