The Influence Of The Scientific Revolution During The 16th And 17th Century

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Three principal events that completely changed European life happened during the 16th and 17th centuries, including the Scientific Revolution. Another was the Protestant Reformation created long-lasting turmoil and devastating religious wars when Martin Luther posted the 95 Theses on the church doors. European expeditions of the new world led explorers to learn and encounter about new people and environments. These events caused many great European minds to question many things that were just accepted facts put forth by the church. Scientists of the time adopted a rigorous new goal set by Francis Bacon, an English philosopher of science: “that human life be endowed with new discoveries and powers.” (Doc. 4). They were influenced by a habitat …show more content…
This relationship is shown through a letter written by Marin Messene, a French monk, to his patron: “If you object to anything, I am ready to remove it entirely…. Whatever may be, the whole thing is up to you.” (doc. 5). Marin is saying that he is willing to not publish any records that his patron disagrees with, but all the results are true and are the same as Galileo’s. Thomas Hobbes, an English philosopher, expanded on this idea in his book, Leviathan, by making public the dependency that scientists of the time had on their patron. Hobbes basically thought that the scientists’ philanthropists decided, based on beliefs, what got read by the public eye by saying: “right and wrong is perpetually disputed both by the pen and by the sword, but geometry is not. … If Euclid’s proposition … conflicted with the interests of those who rule, I know it would be suppressed.” (doc.7) However, not every wealthy person limited science. For example, the French Royal Academy, which was a science society based in Paris, was sponsored by King Louis XIV. His glorious visit was commemorated by a sketch in 1671 (doc. 10). Jean-Baptiste wrote to Louis XIV stating that: “…at home an abundance of wealth and in causing the arts and sciences to flourish… to establish several academies for both letters and sciences.” (Doc. 11). He …show more content…
The collaboration of classes to further the standard of life and science proved that the world was ready for new advancements. Envelopes were pushed by men and women about science and philosophy. The Church, basically, ruled Europe with its strict status quo and reluctance to change, even though many thought The Church and Science could exist happily together. Henry Oldenbury once said in a letter to a German scientist, “Friendship among learned men is a great aid to the investigation and elucidation of the truth. Friendship should be spread through the whole world of learning…” (doc.

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