The Influence Of The Patriot Act

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While the government thought the Patriot Act helped catch terrorists, it actually lacked efficiency. It was unconstitutional that the government could allow the Attorney General to detain foreigner who wanted to immigrant in the United States to suspect if they looked suspicious. Most of people under the Act were put in prison without charges and regardless if they are innocent. Also, it wasted lots of vital resources on researching everybody and waste of money.
Also, Patriot Act gave the FBI to increase entitled to spy on people which strip human rights. The government should always think that people was innocent before they found guilty and it supposed not to have privilege above the law. However, the Patriot Act did in an opposite way about looking people of what they had done before they were sentenced. Americans couldn’t be investigated based on the First Amendment, which states that human has the freedom speech. The government could monitor on people religious and political institutions, which people had to think before they speak out because the government had the power to judge it without any evidence. (USA PATRIOT ACT).
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The law also breached the Fourth Amendment, which should protect people from being search and seizure. It raised controversial issues, such as violating the Constitution and agents could monitor a terrorist even if they haven’t found evidence he belongs to a foreign terrorist organization. As a result, it had a tremendous impact on our social lives and Patriot Act gave the FBI to access personal information. The government had the authority of surveillance, which allowed them to see on particular person’s communications and suspect houses. US senator Edward Snowden showed the government information about the agency was using the law to justify the bulk collection of data about millions of phone calls.

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