Late 19th And Early Twentieth Century: Article Analysis

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Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Alice Stone Blackwell were a few of the women during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century to lead the way to the passage of the Nineteenth Constitutional Amendment in 1920. The Nineteenth Amendment gave United States citizens the right to vote by prohibiting being denied to vote because of gender. This amendment gave women equal standing along with men in voicing their political opinions on candidates running for office. Women no longer had to suppress their political opinions. The women’s suffrage movement led to the feminist movement. The feminist movement began to end the stereotypical gender role in place by America’s patriarchy society. Women no longer wanted to be seen as housewives, they wanted to work in different types of fields outside of the home. What role has feminism played on women’s political participation, when it comes to running for office and voting for candidates?
Women that are
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This article discusses that when women run for the presidency, the media is more concerned with their outfits rather than political opinions and views, objectifying women. This happened during the 2008 elections when Hillary Clinton was running for president. The fifth and final article is Exploring the Gender Gap in Support for a Woman for President by Stephanie Simon and Crystal L. Hoyt. This article discusses the studies that were conducted on how well society supports a female presidential candidate. In general, the American society approves of women running for the presidential office, but have insufficient support from men due to their political attitudes. The majority of the support for female candidates come from feminist women. This situation occurred during the Hillary Clinton presidential campaign in 2008 because Clinton was the frontrunner, but did not win the

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