What Led To The Civil Rights Movement?

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The statement that “the Civil Rights Movement [CRM]…owed absolutely to African Americans’ experience in World War [2]” is not at all true. World War 2 may have accelerated the growth of the movement, but it was not the only factor that caused Blacks in the US to begin to demand for civil rights. The Great Depression and First Great Migration allowed for World War 2 to be very significant in the lives of Black people. The war helped foster the Movement because its end allowed for a Black middle class to emerge and Black war veterans were more determined than ever to fight for equality. While all of these things are true, it is also true that many Blacks had been fighting for civil rights for decades, such as those with the NAACP, and younger …show more content…
Black war veterans returned home very fed up, and the beginnings of the Black working and middle classes had origins during the war. World War 2 was very influential only because the Great Depression and First Great Migration had brought about small changes that allowed for Black workers to be able to acquire wealth during the war. But there were other important factors that led to the Civil Rights Movement besides World War 2. Most importantly, Blacks all over the country had been fighting for civil rights for literal decades, such as those with the NAACP. Additionally, younger Blacks had always been less willing to accept Jim Crow over generations, and those sentiments were becoming more visible in the 1950s and …show more content…
Therefore, to claim that World War 2 was the most important cause of the Movement would be to discount the decades of work done by Blacks before the 1950s, and the increasing militancy of young Blacks since the end of the Civil War. Instead, it is much more valuable to acknowledge as many of the complicated, interconnected pieces of the Black struggle as possible to make sure each historical narrative is as truthful as

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