The Influence Of The American Revolution

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No event in the late 18th century was as volatile and unpredictable as the American Revolution. Ellis narrates the deeply rare and unique story of how colonial America rose up together to beat the odds and became the largest republic ever in existence and how it could not have been done without the unlikely group of founding fathers who brought their uniqueness and differences together to create something much bigger than themselves. Those who were politically successful and influential during this time period often originated from a place of disadvantage. It was their intellect and hard work that helped them obtain their statuses. This is the American dream: to go from rags to riches, to be born from poverty but rise to the top. Had they been …show more content…
Had circumstances fell in favor of the British, anyone who spoke of revolution might have been charged with treason. The success of the new republic was a fragile contingency. No one knew what was going to happen and the consequences were severe. Had one thing changed or gone wrong, the whole operation may have crumbled under the weight of King George III himself. According to Ellis, “if the British commanders had prosecuted the war more vigorously in the early stages, The Continental Army may very well have been destroyed at the start and the movement for American independence nipped in the bud” (5). What prevented this from happening in the vulnerable beginning stage was England’s underestimation of the American cause. All of the founding fathers were acting purely on faith and conviction. Ellis further points out how incredible it is that the nation was built in the spur of the moment. Anyone could have predicted the eventual separation between the colonies and the British Empire, but no one saw the American Revolution coming so …show more content…
Two Quaker delegations, one from New York, and the other from Philadelphia, presented petitions to the House calling for the federal government to do everything in their power to halt the slave trade immediately. Many like James Jackson, representative from Georgia, felt that this was an inappropriate overstep of condescension from a group that were hardly considered patriots due to their pacifistic refusal to fight in the war. The constitution also clearly stated that congress shall not pass any law interfering with the slave trade until 1808. The Quakers, as well as the Pennsylvania Abolitionist Society, believed that congress should be able to override this issue under the General Welfare Act. Different political leaders came up with their own ideologies as to why slavery should not be abolished. Jackson fought back with evidence from the bible that slavery was God’s will. But the greatest concern of those who were not pro abolition was that slavery was essential to the economy at the time. William Loughton Smith went as far as to assert that, “‘No white man would perform the tasks required to drain the swamps and clear the land, so without slaves it must be depopulated.’” While only a small minority of whites owned slaves, for many those who did, their entire livelihood depended on it. For abolitionists, the outlook was hopeful. Many northern states like Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Connecticut began

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