Chinese Immigration 18th Century

Superior Essays
The United States is often described as a “Melting Pot.” 20,000 years ago people began traveling to the Americas from the Beijing Straits. Since the early days of naval exploration, people have been colonizing the land and forming communities with people of similar nationality and culture. The Spanish, English, Dutch, French and Swedish all established small colonies that would one day grow and attract other cultures. African Slaves were brought into Jamestown in 1619. Later, Irish, Chinese, and Eastern European immigrants came searching for new opportunities and freedom. All these waves of new cultures were bound to come with tension and difficulty assimilating into the “American” way of life. The early explorers of the 16th and 17th century …show more content…
These immigrants were instrumental in the building of railroads throughout the country. Hostility towards the Chinese was prevalent in every level of society, and it became so bad that in 1882, the Chinese Exclusion Act was passed, the first limitation on immigration in US history. It suspended Chinese Immigration entirely for the next ten years, but was later revised and made permanent, though it was repealed in 1943. Laws similar to Jim Crow laws were put in place preventing Chinese from doing things like marrying caucasians and owning land. They were also unable to earn citizenship. Acts were put in place after World War II that restored original rights to Chinese Americans. Japanese faced much of the same discrimination as the Chinese, and were affected by many of the same laws. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, racism against Japanese increased exponentially. Thousands of Japanese Americans were forced into internment camps. In 1988, an apology and $20,000 was given to all survivors of these work …show more content…
While we now worry about Mexican immigration to the United States, in 1830, Mexico forbade emigration to Texas. However, in 1836, Mexico formally agreed to give Texas independance, and it was soon annexed into the United states during the era of Manifest Destiny. Relationships took a turn for the worst in 1846, when, after Mexico refused James Polk’s proposal to make the Rio Grande the country border, the United States invaded, thus beginning the Mexican-American war. The war was short, and ended with the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo two years later. Mexico lost a lot of land, that then became part of the United States. The landowners that lived in what is now parts of modern day California, New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, and Nevada were ensured protection, but were forced out with the onset of the Gold Rush. The last border adjustment came with the Gadsden Purchase, and ended the dispute over border placement. Along with the previously Mexican citizens’ forced integration into the United States, many came quite willingly. Building the railroad required many workers, and attracted many immigrant groups besides the Chinese. The level of people in the workforce building the railroad was suffering after the Chinese Exclusion Act, and Mexico became a convenient place from which to recruit workers. The turmoil of the Mexican Revolution also prompted a large wave of Mexican immigrants between 1910 and

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    The Chinese were believed to be taking all the jobs and fields of work which made white people angry, and as more Chinese were coming toward California the availability of job became scarcer. And as the population grew with more Chinese residents the economy took a downturn which the white Americans blamed on the Chinese. Then, as time passed, white people began to feel that the Chinese had committed an underhanded scheme to take over the American economy, since they filled occupations such as clothing, food, and tobacco which were prevalent fields during that time. As jobs started to decrease for white people they supported the passing of the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 to prevent the Chinese from taking anymore…

    • 1114 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Also in the early 1940’s the U.S set up a program to import temporary agricultural workers from Mexico as a reaction to the shortage of workers from the war. Over the next 20 years about 4.8 million workers came over to provide labor. With the amount of job opportunities that were open at the time, even if you were not able to illegally come there was still a chance that you could apply for one of the jobs and come to America legally. Even though the Mexican immigrants had jobs and were working hard, things still didn 't go smoothly. One of the most famous examples of this is the Zoot Suit Riots of 1943 where there were Anglo American Sailors and Marines targeted Mexicans.…

    • 1062 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    According to Ronald Takaki in his book A Different Mirror, in 1848’s the discovery of gold in California bought a large Chinese wave, the economy in China was despair. Upon arrival to the U.S, the Chinese work was primarily as miners, laundry, fisherman, and grocery operators. In contrast with the Mexican’s, worked in the farms and in agriculture. The Mexicans faced The Porfiriato of 1976-1911 which stated order and progress or in other words modernization and growth. The Mexican revolution in 1910-1920 made them be push out of their country by the difference in wages and because they were pulled by the factories in the field (southwest).…

    • 1149 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “Old immigrants” who were Northern and Western Europeans who immigrated to America before the 1860s, felt economically, politically, and socially threatened by the new immigrants and wanted to protect what they felt was theirs. After a severe recession and many industrial strikes, Congress passed the Chinese Exclusion Act (1882) which “[restricted] the immigration of Chinese into the United States to only a few individuals a year” (Newman ‘00). American society did not have equal opportunities for Chinese immigrants. The economic threat felt by the old immigrants was used to justify the exclusionary legislation passed to favor the old immigrants and allow them to succeed in industry while restricting Chinese immigrants. During the late 19th century and early 20th century, “anti-Semitism increased markedly when millions of Jews from eastern Europe immigrated to the United States”(Newman ‘00).…

    • 1131 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Chinatown Ethnic Enclaves

    • 1754 Words
    • 8 Pages

    The government enacted the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 in order to get rid of Chinese and prevent Chinese from immigrating to the United States. (History.com , 2009) Due to this exclusion act, the Chinese population in the United States was reduced significantly. The Chinese people were driven out of the farms, woolen mills, mines and factories and forced to cluster in urban enclaves for self-protection. These enclaves later on developed into Chinatowns. Facing with increasing racial hostility, a huge number of Chinese were forced to return to their native country permanently, and others began to move out of the west and into other parts of the country.…

    • 1754 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    WWII had opened up job opportunities for Blacks that had not existed before, however many of those opportunities came at the expense of the Japanese while they were in internment camps. This caused racial tensions to rise between the Blacks and Japanese themselves after the war had ended, as portrayed by John Okada, “A shooting gallery stood where once had been a clothing store; fish and chips had replaced a jewelry shop; and a bunch of Negroes were horsing around raucously in front of a pool parlor. Everything looked older and dirtier and…

    • 1803 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This issue was taken up in court in 1946 and the decision that was made caused an uprising from both the Japanese and white community. It was a commonly held belief that Japanese work ethic might overthrow British Columbia, so the Canadian Pacific Railway discharged all Japanese employees. Laws prevented Japanese-Canadians from working in mines and prohibited them from working on any project funded by British Columbia. Japanese people got paid less than white labour unions because they accused the Japanese of stealing jobs, and employers raising higher standards for white unions. A white mob rampaged through Japanese areas in Vancouver to protest against the presence of Japanese workers.…

    • 1035 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    However, over time the price eventually increased to 500 dollars in 1903 (MTCSALC, 2011, p.1). From then, many other laws were contrived based off the detest towards the Japanese including in 1895 when the British Columbia Government denied citizens of Asiatic origin the right to vote. Also, the ’Gentlemen’s Agreement’ in 1908 which prohibited more than 400 male asiatic immigrants per year to enter Canada (Nikkei, 2016, p.1). As hatred for the Japanese grew, more restrictions were put into place. In the years leading up to Japanese internment, 1,200 fishing boats were impounded, curfews were imposed, and cars, cameras, radios, and land was confiscated due to the distrust of Japanese Canadians during the Second World War and the consuming fear of war being…

    • 1831 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Huang Sih Chuen). When the riot was over, 28 Chinese were killed and 15 were wounded (Hon. Huang Sih Chuen). The increase in the railroads provided a lot of jobs to immigrants, but at a…

    • 791 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Mexican Push Factors

    • 1155 Words
    • 5 Pages

    It created a prohibitive act against Chinese. The Chinese were immensely members of United States cheap labor (Beginnings 1848-1920, powerpoint). It was a ten year agreement to ban the Chinese from immigrating to the United States (Henderson, pg 17). Given this law created, there was a dire need for cheap labor in the United States since having banned the Chinese, who were most of the labor workers previously (Henderson, pg 17). Once the Santa Fe and Southern Pacific Railroads met the Central Pacific Railroads, the mass recruitment began for cheap laborers (Henderson, pg 16).…

    • 1155 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays

Related Topics