The Influence Of Punk Rock

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Poor standards of living have plagued communities of color due to the lack of interest by the United States government. Institutionalized racism has led to housing, employment, and educational discrimination, leading to a cycle of poverty. Discriminatory policies have devastating effects for the youth, poor quality of education and no jobs available force young people into gangs and other illegal and dangerous activities in order to survive the harsh conditions of life. As a direct result of reaganomics, black and Latino youth have created their own spaces to voice their frustrations against racism, sexism, poverty, and police brutality. Through punk rock and hip-hop, the youth actively resist the state while establishing cultural citizenship. …show more content…
Punk rockers of color created a safe space for themselves to discuss their current social, economic, and political disenfranchisement. Punk Rockers sang about their poverty, racism, and sexism they faced. Punk rock was an outlet for many youths to express their anger they bottled up during their day-to-day lives. During mosh pits, many punkers had the opportunity to release their anger by dancing aggressively, smashing and slamming into each other. Punk rock became a political platform for many youths to have their voices and frustrations heard. In addition, punk rock also became an outlet for many queer youth, who are not only ignored in mainstream society and mainstream punk but also from their families for not conforming to heteronormativity. Punk rock emerged because of the exclusion many youth of color faced throughout their lives. The intersectionality of their race, gender, and sexual orientation created an unsafe environment for many youth. Punk rock arose as a direct response to the institutional racism black and brown youth …show more content…
Urban life has been degrading long before Reagan came into office. Through chattel slavery, Jim Crows laws, and policies meant to continue the institutionalization of racism have shaped the contemporary lives of black Americans. During the civil rights movement, black Americans along with other marginalized groups began to achieve some political rights. Although only about a decade after the civil rights movement, Reagan definitely further worsened the standard of living for many minorities. Hip-hop was also an outlet for many aggrieved black youth to voice their concerns and frustrations. Like Latinos, African Americans saw a decrease in employment and housing opportunity, faced severe racism from the state and police, and had very limited educational opportunities. Reagan’s trickle down economic policies also denied African Americans of basic fundamental services, like housing, health care, and education. In addition, the wealthy began to gentrify urban cities forcing the displacement of many poor communities. Poor black and brown communities were left in extremely impoverished districts, with little political power, and few resources (Rose). Hip-hop culture became an outlet where black youth were able to express their frustrations against the degrading social life of inner cities. For example graffiti emerged as a central example of the extent of urban decay

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