The Influence Of President Lincoln

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He learned through this that he was going to have to take a more active role in the war than he had anticipated. President Lincoln took on a new role in 1862 of learning how to really fight a war. He started studying war and strategy. He began to seek guidance from his advisers. “He requested information as to the location of forces, their state of readiness, and the levels of arms and ammunition they held… He would never again adhere to the position that a passive containment strategy would suffice to bring the Confederates to their sense and win the war.” (McGovern 2009) By adjusting the Union’s tactics the chances of winning the war was looking much better. There was still a long road ahead for him and for the country. Lincoln also had to …show more content…
Early in the spring of 1864, Lincoln felt confident in his ability to win the reelection, but as summer wore on and the war took a turn for the worse he began to think that there was no way he was going to get reelected. In fact he wrote the following note and had members of his cabinet sign it to verify that he had written it; “This morning, as for some days past, it seems exceedingly probable that this administration shall not be elected. Then it will be my duty to so cooperate with the President elect as to save the Union between the election and the inauguration, as he will have secured this election on such ground that he cannot save it afterwards.” (McGovern 2009) He wrote this in August of 1864, and he clearly thought he was going to lose. The public seemed to becoming more upset with the present state of the war, and the democrats seemed to be gaining …show more content…
The terms that Grant gave Lee were: “all soldiers, including officer, could return to their homes “not to be disturbed by the United States authority so long as they observe their paroles and the laws in force where they may reside.” Through they had to turn in their arms and military equipment, the rebels could keep their horses and could help themselves to twenty-five thousand Union rations.” (McGovern 2009) Essentially this was considered the end of the war. April 11th, President Lincoln gave a speech about reconstruction, how to ease states back into the Union, the plan for state military, for state governments, and he also spoke about black suffrage. “In the crowd, a handsome young actor and Confederate sympathizer name John Wilkes Booth heard those words and said to an associate, “That makes nigger citizenship. That is the last speech he will ever make. By God, I’ll put him through.” (McGovern 2009) At the time Lincoln was completely unaware that his days on earth were very

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