The Influence Of Culture And Race

1350 Words 6 Pages
It is difficult being surrounded in a world where the view on culture and race are always changing There are two ways in which people can go about this, accept defeat and accept the changes, or fight to keep the identity alive. People such as Malcom X, Richard Rodriguez and Gloria Anzaldua were all placed in situations where they decided on what was best for their future. Culture and race had a major influence in their life because that decided whether or not they will succeed in fitting into a new society. Being around people who are not from the same race can discourage them from trying. Richard Rodriguez, a Mexican American, was going to a Roman-Catholic church that was a predominantly an Anglo-Saxon race. In the passage, “Aria: …show more content…
Malcom X, an African-American, who was incarcerated in Charleston Prison did not have much of an education. In the passage, “Literacy Behind Bars” X explained, “Where else but in in a prison could I have attacked my ignorance by being able to study intensely sometimes as much as fifteen hours a day.” (15). An African American didn’t have the same education as a white American, so there was going to be a major gap between the two races, what Malcom X wanted to do is improve his own education, so that he could be a better inspiration. Malcom X mentioned “I spent two days just riffling uncertainly through the dictionary’s pages. I never realized so many words existed!” (4). X decided that he was going to start from the basics and just look at the words from a dictionary and practice. Malcom could have sat around and do nothing, but he wanted to change. Malcom X could not have been inspiration if he did not get an education because there was nothing distinguishing him from other African Americans. By getting an education Malcom X was able to overcome the stereotypical assumption that African Americans cannot get an education and became more educated and he was more presentable to the other people from the same …show more content…
Gloria Anzaldua, a Chicana, did not want to be silenced by the new society. In school English was starting to seem as the home language for America and no other language was going to be accepted. Not only was Spanish being targeted from the Anglo-Saxon, but also from other Mexicans because what she spoke was not Spanish. There was confliction from both sides of her, so she needed to find something that identified herself. In the passage “How to tame a Wild Tongue”, Anzaldua lionizes, “I will no longer be made to feel ashamed of existing. I will have my voice: Indian, Spanish, white. I will have my serpent’s tongue – my woman’s voice, my poet’s voice. I will overcome the tradition of silence.” (40). Not only is her culture slowly being taken away from her through her She realizes that since neither side was going to accept her she made her own identity, which was being a Chicana. In other words Anzaldua will not be silence anymore because she knows if she gives in to the new worlds language then her culture will be dead because the new world was able to change one portion of what makes a culture. This has inspired her way of thinking as more of rebellious act because no one around her was supporting her because other Mexicans wanted her to just give in to the Anglo-Saxon world, but she couldn’t because she didn’t have anything else that she could

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