Eastern And Western Monasticism

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In the span of fifteen hundred years, Eastern and Western Christianity had comparatively been influenced by Jesus’ teachings. The ideology of Jesus Christ included his virginal birth, his death, and resurrection. With this in mind, some of the important reoccurring issues in understanding both concerns for the East and West are founded in the sacramental and liturgical practices. Christ’s death and “resurrection became koinonia: or communion, fellowship, or the church [p. 33, Vol. 1].” The apostles transferred the teachings of Jesus and apply them to the church. In order for citizens to encompass the nature of God, the apostles would assemble a set of rules for those to follow to gain entry into the church. Although the rules of the apostles’ …show more content…
The Eastern Orthodox and Western diasporas struggled to ascertain a firm spiritual devotion for all of Christendom. Although the pursuit in isolation was ideal for the monastic’s, the rules written in ‘The Sayings of the Desert Fathers,’ expanded to other communities in order to spread the faith. Eastern monastic traditions and the Rule of St. Benedict were strongly influenced by the Desert Fathers and spread out to renew the practices [cite]. The Desert Fathers further evolved the structure of the traditional monastic lifestyle into the ninth century, where monastic reform became the new …show more content…
In regards to outside interferences with the church, Louth explains that “virtually all monasteries provided an environment in which individuals could live a life of prayer, with the support of their brothers (or sisters) and the guidance of those with experience, but this purpose could well be supplemented, or even overshadowed, by others [p. 102, Louth].” Further decline in Western and Eastern Christendom were due to the social and political conditions, brought by invaders, poverty and rulers of the abbeys. Complications of the monasteries were now in need of change. In the East, the reforms of the monastics by St. Odo of Cluny encouraged the understanding of the Benedictine rule [pgs. 13-15], while the West “was an attempt to restore the ancient monastic ideals,” provided by St. Theodore of Studite [cite]. The reform movement became important at this time because it established the independence of a secular authority, which would later foster a freedom of religious

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