Mexican Ethnicity

Now lately the crucial focus of political debate in the United States is on the recent arrivals, especially those who come from Mexico, both my race and ethnicity have come into question. Both my ethnicity and race make a greater impact on my life experiences more negatively than positively. As a Hispanic/Latina, I have experienced a considerable amount of stereotyping, discrimination, and racism, especially if I am Mexican-American. The term Latinos is described as, “Persons whose national origins, or whose ancestors’ national origins, are in the countries of Latin America-that is, Mexico and much of the Caribbean, Central and South America” (Feagin, 209). Despite I was born here in the United States, I grew up most of my life back in Mexico …show more content…
The ethnic heritage of Mexicans is mixed, with alternating combinations of African, Indigenous, and European ancestry. Therefore, Mexicans are heterogeneous in their genetic characteristics, differing from having light to brown or dark eye color and skin with several in the brown and mestizo middle. However, innumerable Americans tend to view Mexicans through the stereotypical lens of being non-white or brown, yet to a great extend indigenous-looking. On account of the previous statements, I, Mexican-American, usually provide enigmatical responses to questions based on race, perhaps reflecting my own uncertainty about my race and …show more content…
Strictly speaking, I have become a more open-minded person than before. While I am seen as American back in Mexico, I am considered Mexican in the United States. For instance, I still recall the mocking faces of my classmates when I was in high school, their random stares, insults and taunts. Although I was self-conscious about my actions, my complexion and my “Spanish” accent, I dreaded going to school and wished to be somewhere else. I was also afraid to speak up in class. Supposing that my classmates attributed my silence to shyness, my silence was absolutely caused by fear. In the course of time, I began to tell acquaintances that I was American rather than Mexican. At that moment, the pride that previously came with being a bilingual fade

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