The Industrialization And Political Impacts Of The Gilded Age

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The term “Gilded age” can be imagined as late 1800 century rebuilding its damaged pieces with gold. A time when many believed in the bask of wealth and political changes all across America. These changes came about after the civil war, creating a new era of american history, a period of industrialization, a rapid economic growth and socio cultural development. With both the economy, and the landscape morphing into large scale factories and cities, Labor workers and Farmers fell behind due to the lack of fair opportunity and compensation. To take control, unions were created, and a movement under the People’s Party was conceived. The drive for mass production, made it clear for the need of higher efficiency, lower costs and high prices drives …show more content…
In 1892, the Homestead (steel) Strike occurred, which involved skilled worker at Carnegie steel mill, where jobs were becoming more and more automated, and Carnegie was able to hire less workers for lower wages, almost as if the workers were competing with a machine for a job. For 92 days the mill was held by the state militia, a major battle between the workers of the mill and private security agents erupted, causing 12 deaths. As a result, this was a huge blunder for workers because it setback worker’s right until the 1930, when the federal government recognized labor …show more content…
If we recognized this as a minor occurrence of random luck, this case would be passed off as generalized dissociation between the workers and the company. However, The Pullman did what the Homestead Strike should have address was rights between the people, and how companies can own their lives. The strike was caused by the increase in living cost in Pullman, as well as the decrease in wage. Adding these two components for the company at face value clearly shows lack of rational outside of dealing business and profits. The American Railroad Union (AMU) refused to handle any trains that are by Pullman, which crippled any reach between New York and California, threatening cities with famine. Grover Cleveland ordered troops to mitigate some of the problematic areas, (even when most of the protest displayed little violence) which lead to massacres, raid to AMU headquarters and

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