The Importance Of Hitler To Blame For The Third Reich

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The Holocaust, one of the largest genocides in history, has always been blamed largely on Hitler, the Nazi party, and the S.S officers who organized and carried out such a mass slaughter of people. Though the blame can easily rest on them, Hitler’s success can be appropriately blamed on the support of the ordinary German citizens. What many people do not discuss is how such a radical person could be able to build such a large and willing party, or how he was able to convince an entire country to follow him, even during the atrocities the Nazis committed. From the time Hitler became Chancellor to the fall of the Third Reich, many Germans were his loyal and faithful followers. In 1933, the Nazi party received 44% of the vote in the Reichstag …show more content…
About a year after the economic crash, the Nazi party became the largest party in Germany (The Third Reich). During this time it was difficult to find a job and feed one 's family, and many people felt the shackles of Versailles tightening around them. Because of this, many people felt justified in throwing their support to somebody who could fix their problems. Some Germans believed in the German socialism of the Nazi party, some believed Hitler could solve the unemployment problem, and some saw the Nazi party as a way to break from the shame of the Treaty of Versailles and gain freedom from foreign interference (Lucas 35). His promises to improve the economy and restore pride to the nation were appealing to many Germans who, up until this point, had felt ashamed to be German and had begun to lose faith in their once great country. The Nazi party gained popularity in the 20’s and 30’s by promising to “rearm, to reclaim German territory…. and to regain prominence again among European and world powers after a humiliating defeat” (“Timeline of Events”). However, Hitler didn’t only promise to better the country; when he came to power, he succeeded in restoring their pride and economy and unifying the people. “When Hitler... came to power, Germany was a weak nation crippled by inflation and burdened with millions of unemployed. By 1939 Germany was once again a major military power in Europe” (Lucas 7). Through his promises and his actions, Hitler emerged as a savior to the German people. In the beginning he proved himself by fixing issues in the country and gained the support of the majority; the faithful many who would support him, even throughout the

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