The Indian Adoption System: The Effects Of The Indian Child Welfare System

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This research paper looks at the Indian Child Welfare system from its inception until today. It involves the many Native American Indian families who survived the genocide of their people forced onto government-designated reservations where their people were integrated into the majority culture (Brown, 2001). It will examine the effects of the many Indian children who were first placed into American Indian boarding schools where their native tongues, cultural religion, and dress were prohibited and then subjected to being placed in Caucasian homes during school breaks. It will explore the result of this placement on these children who were deprived of a relationship with their biological families and robbed of their cultural heritage (Stewart, …show more content…
Unfortunately, the children became the target and their removal became the solution. This became apparent n the Indian Adoption Project (IAP). The IAP, headed by Arnold Lyslo claimed that it was in the best interest of Indian children from western and Great Lakes States to be placed in adoptive homes that were located in northeastern mid-Atlantic and mid-western states because regional prejudices prevent many homeless Indian children from being adopted. Some supporters of the IAP said it was abnormal for Indian children that were born to single or married mothers to be placed with extended family members of Indian tribes such as the grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, and other clan members to bring up these …show more content…
Remember, the deep-rooted fear the Native American Indians had about government agencies who had the power to place their children and their perceptions and views of the foster care system were bitter feelings of discouragement of all those involving, including human service professionals. However, in order for the tribal community to feel secure about placing maltreated Indian children in foster care, Cross (1996) had to substantiate these beliefs by reporting that child welfare agencies intent on recruiting American Indians as foster care and adoptive families must first address these feelings by “going to the community and asking elders, community leaders, and other Indian foster parents” (p. 66) for assistance. This was very vital because Indians would have to be convinced that the agencies’ concern was for the children and families involved, and their goal was to protect the best interest of Indian children by preserving Indian families as well as keeping the connection between them and the tribes. In as much as in the tribal community Indian children are sacred and highly valued by their birthparents and all tribal members (Cross,

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