The Inca Empire: The Characteristics Of The Incca Empire

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To define topography is by thinking about the arrangement of natural or artificial materials of an area. There is the geographic component as part of the definition, but for locations like the Inca Empire had a much deeper meaning. The topography of the Inca Empire was what formed the culture; therefore it discusses the way of life and adaption for the people. As the definition of topography is defined as the natural material and what is illustrated from the map, there is an important aspect to consider. It is crucial to first consider the creation story because it is first approach on understanding the people’s connection to their environment. As well as how they adapted by creating these rituals to honour their ancestor. Therefore, when …show more content…
During the formation of the Inca Empire, the people had a kin system called ayllu. In a typical ayllu would consist of two or three opposing components, generally called upper (hanan) and lower (hurin). Each member of an ayllu is assigned a production zone to create a basic life for him or herself. Spouses of a member from an ayllu would typically be a part of another ayllu. The organization of labor is organized by gender, but a married couple is a whole together. Therefore, ayllu was in a way an agricultural practice because ayllu unit believe they share a common ancestor and their ancestor is the one who provided them with the land. To show respect to their ancestor, they had to maintain the land by dividing up the labour to different members of an ayllu. However, there was still climate change that affected this agricultural practice. November and December were important growing seasons and towards the end of the season, sowing would move from the highest point to the lowest, so it would occur at the same time as the first rain. This irrigating method helps with activating the harvest forward and battle against the frost, therefore the people would have a successful crop elsewhere. The changing of seasons and the moving of crops in a way illustrates a same definition of topography because it is rearranging the harvest to have …show more content…
Cuzco most definitely sets the stage for the Inca Empire because this is the capital city that later would develop into this civilization. It has been discussed earlier the founding of Cuzco by the creator god, Virachocha. However, since the people use oral traditions to pass down stories, there are many different sources on how the name, Cuzco, came to be. “Some of the earliest Spanish authors took the term el Cuzco (the Cuzco), to refer to a person, not a place (Ramirez 2005:14-23).” The term, Cuzco, has become an ongoing argument between scholars because on one side it was stated that Cuzco actually refers to a place, but Ramirez continually argue that it was a title. Imperial rulers in the Inca Empire did not use their childhood name, but used titles when they assumed the throne. Therefore Ramirez (2005) stated that the first account of a sitting ruler named, Wayna Qhapaq, has assumed the title “the old Cuzco.” In a more modern term, Cuzco can be translated to the word qosqo, which translate to “dried up lake bed.” The early village of Cuzco actually lay on a swampy area; therefore it made sense in a modern sense (D’Altroy, 2015:

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