Essay On Inca Civilization

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Inca civilization

The Inca civilization arrived in Peru between 1400 and 1533 CE. Their empire extended across western South America from Quito in the north to Santiago in the south, making it the largest empire ever seen in the Americas and the largest in the world at that time. The Incas conquered people and exploited landscapes such as plains, mountains, deserts, and tropical jungle.
Out of the ten million people living in the Inca Empire at the time of the Spanish conquest in 1533, the majority were people who worked really hard from dawn till dusk. The Inca rulers were keen psychologists who created a system to make sure that their people had neither the time nor the energy to fight back, commit crimes, or avoid their duties to the empire,
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Although Inca noblemen were allowed to practice polygamy, monogamy was the rule among the common people of the empire. When young couples decided to marry, they often entered into a trial marriage, to see if it would work. If it failed, both partners could go on to enter a new marriage without shame. However, Inca law stated that once a couple was officially married, they had to remain together for life. Even if divorces had been allowed, it would have been almost impossible to support oneself outside of marriage, because the Inca government distributed land only to married couples.
The Inca spoke the Quechua language. They couldn’t write, but they used quipus, which were strings with a system of knots attached to them. That’s how they recorded their harvest.
Their huge empire has fallen because of an epidemic of smallpox brought to their world be early visitors of Europe.
As an effect of this conquest, many aspects of Inca culture were systematically destroyed or permanently changed. In addition to disease and population decline, a large portion of the Inca population including artisans and crafts people was in prison and forced to work in the gold and silver mines. New buildings and cities were built by the Spanish on top of Inca foundations. Cities and towns were pillaged, along with a vast amount of traditional artwork, craft, and

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