The Importance Of Youth Crime

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As a person grows up, they experience the different stages of life, such as childhood, adolescent or teenage years, and ultimately adulthood. Society views adults and teenagers differently because adults are “adults,” they are: mature, developed, and experienced at this so called game, life. So why does this limit become blurred when an adolescent commits a crime, suddenly they are being attacked on the basis that they are mature enough to understand their actions. These characteristics like knowledge and maturity are those that naturally correspond to adults. The law defines a juvenile offender as a “person who is not old enough to be held responsible for criminal acts,” so why is it then that society is quick to prosecute a child as an adult …show more content…
For example, in Vincent Schiraldi’s article “Lessons Can Be Learned,” he uses the murderer Nathaniel Abraham, eleven years of age, as a focal point in his work to argue that “We shouldn’t look to explain why youth crime is on the increase…We shouldn’t look at why kids commit more violent crimes than adults, as 60 percent of respondents to a 1996 California poll believe…We shouldn’t look at why kids are killing at younger and younger ages, a refrain we head with particular frequency” (Schiraldi’s 122). He vocalizes that, instead of prosecuting juveniles as adults, we should be investing in programs that help troubled teens cope with their psychological problems or the obstacles they face in their home environment. He adds “Again, Moore pointed out in his sentencing decision…It is only by intervening now and helping to develop mature, responsible, caring, empathic children, that we can assure a safer society” (pg.122). Being able to prevent juvenile delinquents from becoming criminals is a great solution, instead of sentencing them as to life in prison. Intervening can decrease the amount of juveniles reoffending if more programs existed for juvenile while they are in prison or even before they commit the actual murder. Helping adolescents with their mental problems would be easier than helping a young teenager …show more content…
Their reasoning is not fully developed. They are not adults” (Lundstrom 88, paragraph 14). This strikes the reader because there are many other sources and personal observations that one has come to create. This then causes people to feel skeptical about the opposing perspectives. Children cannot be put at a higher standard in the eyes of the law. It is out of order to expect a child or teenager to take account for their crimes when they cannot comprehend the heinous actions they have committed. We expect children to mess up, it is part of the lessons they need to experience to learn from their mistakes, but this also introduces a new argument, what if they know what their actions are and still continue? This is where one can see that children are not mentally stable around their adolescent hood, hence, they must always be checked on by family, friends, and teachers in order to keep them stable and mentally

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