The Importance Of Witnessing

1021 Words 4 Pages
Witnessing has many different meaning associated with it. The definition that will be used in this essay is “the study of a group of people for the purpose of understanding their way of being, culture, and history.” The Museum of Anthropology (MOA) invites people to witness aboriginal culture so that they may learn about the indigenous way of life. While visiting MOA one may find themselves viewing exhibits that range from spiritual artifacts to drums played by tribes in Papa New Guinea. European settlers have affected the indigenous people in a very negative way, this too is displayed at the MOA. The Truth and Reconciliation’s (TRC) report delves into this topic as well. The TRC examines the effect that residential schools had on the aboriginal …show more content…
This is ever present with the TRC’s events where people attend to hear stories about survivor’s residential schools. The conversations are crucial since it shows the survivors that people care what happened to them, it allows for non-aboriginals to get a sense of the impact residential schools had, and it kick starts the healing process. It can be difficult to understand the residential schools impact without having experienced them personal, by allowing people to witness events and hear stories from the survivors it aids individual’s understandings of the atrocities that took place. Non-aboriginals can empathize a deeper level than before. It also instigates the process of healing and reconciliation between aboriginals and their families, as well as with non-aboriginals. The goal of the TRC is to start a dialog to help Canadians “[come] to terms with events of the past in a manner that overcomes conflict and establishes a respectful and healthy relationship.” (pg.6) The TRC is successful in their goal as shown by Ina Seitcher, a Christie residential school student, “I need to speak for my mom and dad who went to residential school, for my aunts, my uncles, all that are beyond now.” (pg.15) Ina’s need to speak for her family demonstrates the effectiveness of the TRC’s healing capacity. It allows her to begin the process of reconciliation and healing. Witnessing allows people to get to a …show more content…
The unbiased information provided us with facts about indigenous life that that were not swayed one way or another. They just told the story. This helped give an understanding about the indigenous culture that we previously did not have. During the tour of the MOA we witnessed an entire culture. The TRC took us on a different route. It opened our minds to the truth, and unclouded the myths surrounding the residential schools. We learned the facts about life in residential schools, about the poor treatment and the culture genocide that took place. Witnessing at both the MOA and TRC are important since they break down aboriginal stereo types and replaces them with a sense of respect and admiration. A crucial step for the Canadian population if we are ever going to reconcile what happened in the past and move on to a better

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