The Importance Of Wind Power In Australia

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Wind power has been used in Australia ever since the first wind farm was opened in Esperance, WA in 1987. Since then, an additional 76 farms have been constructed all around the country and currently provide 5% of the nation’s power (David Clarke, 2012). It is a form of renewable energy that uses a strong flow of air to rotate three large blades connected to a generator to produce electricity. Wind turbines convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical power (energy.gov, 2014). Compared to other forms of energy production, wind power is one of the world’s greenest and most environmentally sustainable energy sources. Mathias Aarre Maehlum states that as it harnesses wind energy, no pollution to the environment occurs, especially in …show more content…
In 2012, David Clark claimed that Australia has an incredible potential for wind farm development, but believes the government must begin to take a more positive outlook on wind power and its future in Australia if it is to reach this potential. Many such as RP Siegel believe wind power is quite an inconsistent and unpredictable source of energy as it is often seen as an unreliable method of producing electricity. Others, including Con Doolan in his piece “The real science on wind farms and infrasound”, said that many complaints are received each year about noise and even impacts on the health of residents living in neighbouring areas around wind farms. Through the use of these arguments, this investigation will aim to discuss the benefits and disadvantages associated with the use of wind energy in Australia and whether the government should consider it as a viable power …show more content…
Wind energy in itself is a source of renewable energy, meaning that its supplies will never be depleted. Kukreja goes on to explain that wind power will never run out and unlike fossil fuels that will eventually expire, wind energy has a tremendous potential that can be used to produce a free source of power just like solar and hydro power (Rinkesh Kukreja, 2009). In 2015, Mathias Aarre Maehlum supported these claims, saying that harnessing wind energy does not pollute the environment nearly as much as fossil fuels, coal and nuclear power do. The argument most frequently made in favour of wind energy is that it reduces CO2 emissions. The electricity generated replaces power that would (especially in Australia) otherwise be generated by burning fossil fuels. Therefore, the larger the proportion of wind power in our electricity supply, the less production of atmospheric greenhouse gasses will develop. Studies conducted by S Merz in 2012 found that for every megawatt per hour of electricity that is generated by an Australian wind farm, on average, there is nearly a tonne less greenhouse carbon dioxide released than in the absence of those farms. In turn, this greatly contributes towards lessening the effects of global warming (David Clarke,

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