The Importance Of Voting: Fundamental Right In The United States

Improved Essays
Voting is considered a fundamental right in the United States. Anyone over the age of 18 is entitled to have their voice heard at the polls. Unless they are a felon. Most Felons do not have the right to vote. That might change as states rethink the laws that deny felons a vote.

Voting laws are dealt with state by state and are not federally regulated. Because of that, the laws that deny felons a voice at the polls differ from state to state. What keeps felons from voting depends on the specific state, the crime committed and the time since the completion of their sentence. Right now the laws that are in place are denying almost 6 million men and women the right to vote. The country that prides itself on freedom sure doesn’t feel very free.

With an election coming up both sides want and need all the voters they can get. Which is why both sides are fighting to change the laws. Rand Paul, the Republican Senator of Kentucky is pushing for his state to remove the barriers in place that do not allow felons to vote. There is also push on the Democratic side; in 2007 Hillary Clinton introduced a bill that would restore the right to vote for all previous felons once their time was served.
…show more content…
Some believe that because people made such a drastic mistake in the past that they are somehow incapable of ever learning to be a productive citizen. People often fulfill the expectations that are linked to them, this can be both good and bad. So instead of treating people who made a mistake as if they will always make mistakes; maybe it would be better to understand that a bad mistake, doesn’t necessarily make a bad human. Allowing felons throughout the US a voice once their time has been served is simply the right things to

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Kentucky for example, is known to ban felons from voting for life, which includes “an estimated 7.4 percent of voting-age Kentuckians” (Kenning). However, there is a possibility for a felon to regain their voting rights in Kentucky: “felons with completed sentences, probation and parole can petition the governor for the right to vote, but it 's a process reform advocates say is not uniform” (Kenning). While it is possible, it is not easy for most felons. Positive change has been made in the restoration of felon voting rights, but is something that will progress slowly and require significant lobbying effort in state…

    • 797 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Given these points felons right to vote is a written law and is against the law if it is written in the constitution the state is not allowing ex-felons having the right to vote is considered unlawful. Getting right to vote restored is one of the ways ex-felons can use to get back in the working society and starting a new after being incarcerated for a long period of time, for them it could be a joyous event or a stepping stone in their…

    • 1347 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    When firearms are controlled our rights are breached. Our forefather fought for our rights, and anti gun people think they can just take away our rights. By banning guns the government would be taking countless of jobs away from hard working americans.Theres is countless of made in america gun manufactured in the states. Images people losing their jobs because of some people who do not like guns. How can people sleep at night when they are the reason why the beard winner for the family losing their job.…

    • 1489 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Freedom and Equality, the two most valued ideologies in our culture today, are always being fought over. Democrats and Republicans have been debating over which is the most important to our society today, but what they do not realize is that both are equally important. One of the most current controversial issues is gun control. On January 7, 2016 President Barack Obama made an executive order to improve gun safety. He has now made it impossible to purchase any type of gun without a background check.…

    • 950 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    States who enforce laws that take away the right to vote do not treat criminals as if they are normal U.S. citizens. All states have different voting laws for felons which comes from the constitution, however, denying a citizen the right to vote is equivalent to taking away their citizenship and it could also have a negative effect for those running for office. Different Voting Laws The United States is one of the most harshest countries in the world when it comes to denying a vote for someone who has been convicted of a felony. In 11 states some felons may vote depending on the crime committed and the time elapsed since the end of their sentence. In 20 states, voting rights are restored after the term of incarceration, parole, and probation.…

    • 1520 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    It 's hard to see someone you love and others like that person to have a hard time getting back into society. I understand why they are viewed like this since they did after all break a law. However, if they did the time and on top of that if they complete parole or probation, I do not see the problem in not granting this basic right every citizen owns. Breaking the law should not mean you lose the right to be an American citizen. In the future, ex-felons…

    • 1578 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The government also cannot remove all firearms from society, because there are many guns that are not registered. The government could go door to door demanding that we give up our firearms, but people could get away with keeping the guns that are not registered. This effort would leave a very large supply of firearms in society, and mostly in the hands of the criminal element. A more obtainable law would be to ban the sale of all firearms and ammunition, but that would still leave tens of thousands of guns in society. It is estimated that there are between 270 million and 310 million guns owned by civilians in America (“United States-Gun Facts, Figures and Laws”).…

    • 1808 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The U.S. would not be better off without the "Bill of Rights", in fact America would presumably fall apart without it. The Bill of Rights has protected the citizens of America from being attacked and treated unjustly by the government as well as others. Without the Bill of Rights, Congress would possess the ability to have complete control over the citizens, meaning they could search ones house without a warrant or they could make it illegal to have an opinion and to practice a religion. Essentially, many of the privileges we have today would no longer be given to us without the "Bill of Rights". Law-abiding citizens definitely need the "Bill of Rights" as without it they may no longer be law-abiding.…

    • 1144 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “Some say those who break the law lack the trustworthiness to make it” (Krajick). The lack of trust makes the US not give up the rights to vote to prisoners. They were trusted once and they decided to break the law and end up in jail. If they were trusted once and they took advantage they shouldn’t be trusted again. Although prisoners and ex-prisoners make part of who the United…

    • 1007 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The United States Constitution and its interpretation has been a key aspect that is considered in determining one’s opinion on felons’ voting rights. Since our nation’s Constitution outlines rights that citizens are entitled to, some argue that voting restrictions imposed on convicted felons deprive them of these Constitutional rights and consider this unequal treatment. Others argue that the status of being a convicted felon legally justifies unequal treatment and the right to vote should only be given to law-abiding citizens. The reinstatement of voting rights should not be automatically granted, rather the felon’s individual rights should be restored only after approval of his application to his state’s…

    • 907 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays