The Importance Of Villain

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“What the world fails to realise is a villain is just a victim whose story hasn’t been told” (Colfer.) This quote comes from Chris Colfer and I think it should be in the back of everyone’s mind when reading or watching a villain’s behavior and actions. Just as our hero can turn out to be wicked, our villain could actually be the most heroic character in a story. You can never take what’s happening for face value right away; you have to think outside of what you’re being presented. Perhaps there is more to a story than you realise. Perhaps there is something far more evil going on behind the scenes. Characters may not be acting on their own accord; someone could be pulling the strings. Some people just want to use others for their own personal …show more content…
They expose our character’s negative emotions and twist them into something darker. They manipulate, control, and use. Our characters get trapped in this web of lies and false promises and once they’re stuck, it’s hard to break free. Although this should not excuse the character of his immoral actions, manipulation is a reasonable explanation for why the villain or hero behaves the way they do, especially when weakened by their self struggle, feelings of isolation, and disillusionment with life. Once under the will power of another, it would be hard to escape but morals will eventually triumph over the false promises of manipulation. Manipulation is definitely the case when it comes to William Shakespeare’s Hamlet and Loki from Norse mythology. Loki’s story begins in Thor directed by Kenneth Branagh where it is shown that he lives in the shadow of his older brother Thor. Loki works hard to try and please his father Odin but is ostracized by other Asgardians since he doesn’t crave battle as they do. “A wise king never seeks out war but he must always be ready for it” (Branagh). This quote comes from Odin and it can easily be said that Loki builds himself around these words. …show more content…
A world will be his. The universe, yours. And the humans, what can they do but burn?” (Whedon). Some of the first words spoken in Avengers directed by Joss Whedon that talk about a plan made to have Loki lead the Chitauri down to Earth to retrieve the Tesseract for Thanos. In exchange for completing this “glorious purpose” he’s been burdened with, Loki is promised control of Earth. Since he was unsuccessful in becoming king of Asgard, why not the next best thing right? “He never considers the difficulties involved in conquering, pacifying and occupying Earth. He thinks if he just brings in an army, the humans will fall in line and submit to him, ignorant of Earth 's military forces, the members of the Avengers, and who-knows-what-else including the other Asgardians, that will want to have words with him once the Chitauri leave. Even if his invasion succeeded, it never would have lasted” (“Characters: Thor” 3). Of course Loki considers the difficulties and knows it won’t last; he’s always thinking ahead. Loki knows the Avengers will try to stop him; he’s counting on it. Loki acts like he wants Earth in the end when really, he’s already working on a plan to make sure the Avengers stop the Chitauri and secure the Tesseract. “I want to know why Loki let us take him. He’s not leading an army from here” (Whedon). This is said by Captain America as he and fellow Avengers question how easy it was to capture Loki. He can

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