The Importance Of Victorian Society By Lewis Carroll

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Lewis Carroll expressed his opinion on many subjects in his novel. A common area he had frequently liked to touch on and poke fun of was Victorian Society. During this time it was expected for young women to be very knowledgeable in arts in literature. People were viewed differently depending on their social class. In general, the more money someone had, the more power they had possessed as well. While everyone during this time was trying to conform and be seen as proper and sophisticated, Carroll was creating stories where real logic does not always apply and impossible things were made to be possible. Through the looking-glass, everything appeared to be backwards and this may be what he was trying to show, that the Victorian expectations …show more content…
Children were not taken very seriously during this time because they needed to grow and mature in order to be successful. Alice was a piece in a large game of chess, playing the White Queen’s pawn. The position seemed insignificant compared to the Queen that she was working to become. As a pawn she was not able to give orders, much like a child cannot tell an adult what to do. Once she was able to become a Queen, that is when she was able to have more freedom and give orders. At the banquet she experimented giving out an order to see if it would be followed (222). Children during the Victorian era were not given much thought until they were thought to have matured. To please an adult and show respect, children would have to listen and do whatever needed to be done. Compared to an adult, it was thought that their knowledge of certain things was much lower. Although Alice had worked to become a Queen, it was still not good enough for the Red and White Queens. The Red Queen told Alice, “You can’t be a Queen, you know, till you’ve passed the proper examination” (212). Adults had been very controlling over young children and giving them constant hoops to jump …show more content…
Power and status, something many had no control over, had meant a lot to people. The higher status of the Tiger-lily and the Rose had meant nothing to Alice, but she had noticed the rudeness coming from them. Although the flowers shared the garden, it was obvious who was in charge. Not only were those of a lower class disrespected often, the children were as well. Children are young and imaginative and not valued for giving their opinion until they were older. They were often told what to do and taught how to act a certain way. Lewis Carroll had used his novel, Through the Looking-Glass to show the strangeness of Victorian society and that the real word should have been reversed during this time. Manners and formality should not have mattered as much as it did. Wealth or lack thereof should not have determined how far someone was able to go. In addition, Children should have been treated with more respect and admiration rather than an

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