Nature And Nurture In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Improved Essays
Over the years the lasting debate has been whether values or evils play a bigger role in the scientific exploration and development of the human race. Supporters of the side favoring values believe that humans are born evil, as if it is evolutionary programming. As to supporters of evils are defined through harmful and pernicious acts. The author of Frankenstein, Mary Shelley believes the opposing side of this debate. The novel takes place in an eerie setting, with gothic and romantic elements of literature. Victor Frankenstein, assembles a creature out of body parts from corpses. Due to abandonment the creature turns into a monster that despises the human race. Throughout the novel various events depict the dramatic change from the creature …show more content…
Whether one is born to earth or is a creation, such as the creature, nurture is imperative and vital to growing up or there will be many repercussions. Rather than nurturing his creation, Victor Frankenstein says, “When I [think] of him I [gnash] my teeth, my eyes [become] inflamed, and I ardently [wish] to extinguish that life which I had so thoughtlessly bestowed” (Shelley 62). These are no words from a man that nurture their loved ones, but words towards a fiend. When the creature sees Frankenstein in the valley, the creature says, “Will no intreaties cause thee to turn a favourable eye upon thy creature, who implores thy goodness and compassion? Believe me, Frankenstein: I was benevolent; my soul glowed with love and humanity; but I am not alone, miserably alone? You, my creator, abhor me…” (Shelley 69). Consistent lack of nurture leads to evil consequences in a being. The creature pours his heart out to Victor not being there for him, yet he still does not obtain the attention and consolation he deserves and needs in order to fully function in the real world. At this point, the creature is so hurt and says, “You accuse me of murder, and yet you would, with a satisfied conscience, destroy your own creature” (Shelley 69). Not only does Victor say uncouth, ill-mannered comments to his creation, but abandons him only in hopes of him dying. Evil has taken over the previous values of scientific exploration, causing the creature to question, “Why do you call to my remembrance… (Creature gets cut off by Victor) “Circumstances, of which I shudder to reflect, that I have been the miserable origin and author? Cursed be the day, abhorred devil, in which you first saw light!” (Shelley 69). What was once a major accomplishment of Victor is now being expressed as a burden. Malicious words pour out from Victor’s mouth like a waterfall, which does nothing but lead the creature to act out

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    Frankenstein did not have remorse in the creation of the monster. He only regretted that he failed in making his being perfect. Frankenstein, had he succeeded in the task of killing the monster, would most likely try again. The monster, on the other hand, realized the horrible things he had done and planned to kill himself to make up for it. He recognized the faults in his morals and decided that he was too bad of a person to be saved.…

    • 892 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The creature was never given a fair chance, thanks to the monster who made him. All of the sorrow is a result of a man 's utter inability to take responsibility for his own mess. Shelley attempts to shed light on a number of topics. To name a few: the dangers of obsession, man should not play God, even the slow fade from man to monster. Shelley is very potent on the topics she writes about, she gets her messages across loud and clear.…

    • 1001 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    As the monster proves his self worth, Victor loses his and morphed into a monster himself. This was the result of his use of knowledge. Shelley uses Frankenstein’s actions to prove that too much knowledge can be dangerous and even fatal. Victor is responsible for the deaths…

    • 1300 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    "I was now about to form another being, of whose dispositions I was alike ignorant; she might become ten thousand times more malignant than her mate, and delight, for its own sake, in murder and wretchedness." (Shelley 170) Frankenstein may say his reasonings were to save society from another murderous being, but his decision to destroy the mate in view of the Creature suggests something more. Frankenstein destroys the mate, which upsets the Creature, as his own form of revenge. Considering the Creature murdered William, Frankenstein uses the “eye for an eye” justification by taking away the Creature’s potential companion. Both of them have suffered a loss.…

    • 1662 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Victor himself speaks of his horror upon seeing his creation when it was brought to life, “I beheld the wretch—the miserable monster whom I had created. He held up the curtain of the bed; and his eyes, if eyes they may be called, were fixed on me. His jaws opened, and he muttered some inarticulate sounds, while a grin wrinkled his cheeks” (Shelley, Frankenstein 44). The reader can see how he, and even those of a stronger disposition, would have fled. However, even this fear doesn’t excuse Victor’s breach of responsibility, being the one who brought this monster into the world he owed the monster some form of care, be it actual compassion and attention, or seeing that the monster was destroyed to end his suffering and preserve the lives of others.…

    • 1234 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    If Victors fulfillment would be to kill his own creation before he dies then he is far from humane, “I must pursue and destroy the being whom I gave existence; then my lot on earth will be fulfilled and I may die.” (Shelley 158). For this reason, the creation is more human than Victor, if the creation would have had a better creator he could have conformed to society. The creation is smart, and even though society has shunned him due to his looks, he knows that Victor gave up on helping him fit into the world and began to hate him along with the others, “I am malicious because I am miserable. I am not shunned and hated by all mankind? You, my creator, would tear me to pieces.” (Shelley…

    • 869 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Potential In Frankenstein

    • 889 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The monster says that he hates himself for all of the horrible atrocities he has committed, but rationalizes it with the belief that he had no other choice. Without easy friendship or happiness to be found, the monster succumbs to the belief that none could possibly exist. Seemingly faced with a life without happiness, the only course of action he let himself see was to make his creator feel how his life was. He tells Robert that, “He sought his own enjoyment in feelings and passions from the indulgence of which I was for ever barred, then impotent envy and bitter indignation filled me with an insatiable thirst for vengeance.” The monster was so blinded by anger and jealousy that his creator could experience love while he was denied it that he decided he must destroy the source of said…

    • 889 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    He steals parts of human carcasses from a charnel-house, the dissecting room, and the slaughterhouse. Stealing is defined by society as an immoral act that falls under criminal actions, but Frankenstein ignores this universal rule in favor of doing as he pleases, which furthers the rift between Frankenstein and society. There are many moments where he was at “the very brink of certainty, [but he] failed [at creating life from death]; yet still [he] clung to the hope which the next day or the next hour might realize,” (39). This is another example of Frankenstein’s God Complex because he believes he has “unlimited personal potential” (Analytical Psychology and…

    • 1184 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The creature soon becomes a monster after committing a murder in vengeance of Victor for abandoning him to be left in the cold hearted world that cannot let him simply exist and have somebody to love or to love him. “I will revenge my injuries; if I cannot inspire love, I will cause fear, and if chiefly towards you my archenemy, because my creator, do I swear inextinguishable hatred,” the creature only wants to love the people around him not hurt, but since the people misjudge him because he appears different from everyone else he wants to get back at the world for bringing him pain. Victor had created the first step into creating a monster by running away from the creature who had not done anything wrong. Moreover, the creature wonders off looking for people to turn to, not wanting to cause any harm to those but simply for attention and support. Not knowing what it had done to deserve any of these cruel rejections and suffering, nobody cared for this living being which needed affection desperately to feel whole.…

    • 1072 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Dr. Frankenstein actually does not care about Justine’s life. He knows that he is the indirect murder of his brother, but he tries to do nothing to save Justine. As he confesses himself in the novel, “But I, the true murderer, felt the never-dying worm alive in my bosom, which allowed of ho hope or consolation” (64). Although Dr. Frankenstein always reveals his grief for Justine in the novel, he decides to put himself in the first place when it comes to contradiction of the cost of Justine’s life and his own reputation which indicates his hypocrisy. After Justine died, Dr. Frankenstein knew that he “committed deeds of mischief” (65).…

    • 798 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays