The Importance Of Universal Healthcare Coverage

841 Words 4 Pages
Universal healthcare coverage is an issue that has divided the socio-political structure of the United States for decades, and continues to polarize the electorate in the upcoming election. Proponents argue that healthcare is a universal human right that should not just be readily available, but provided as an entitlement from the government to the population. Opponents provide counterarguments that private, free market coverage is superior to the government-funded option and lowers costs to create a better system for all. The polarization and dissension about the issue demonstrates the importance of the question: should the government provide universal healthcare coverage for its population? To better understand the issue, one must clearly …show more content…
Research shows that the most prevalent are medically related bankruptcies and collection agencies. According to experts from the American Journal of Medicine, around 62% of all bankruptcies in the US were related to medical expenses that exceeded their means to pay. The long-term effects of bankruptcy are catastrophic for financial health and include denial of home mortgages, car notes, and in some cases losing a job. The most telling problem in this research is that many of those bankruptcies filed were from people that already had health insurance but the company didn 't cover all of their necessary expenses. Proponents contend that by providing public universal healthcare coverage, medical bankruptcies and collections would be alleviated due to expenses being covered by the …show more content…
They cite the inefficiency in many countries with universal healthcare coverage that lead to many diseases going untreated due to long wait times. According to researchers from the Fraser Institute, the average wait time to see a medical specialist in Canada was 8 weeks in 2013 compared to a mere 18.5 days in the U.S. In addition to the international outlook, opponents discuss the U.S. Medicaid program and according to the Government Accountability Office (GAO), 9.4% of Medicaid recipients had trouble receiving treatment compared to 4.2% of those with private insurance coverage. These arguments were often referenced during the debate over the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act by arguing that government entities would preside over death panels that due to the inefficiency of bureaucracy and the subsequent wait times and judgments, could lead to a lack of treatment and wait times for fatal

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