The Importance Of Traditional Martial Arts

Better Essays
In addition to the physical aspects of any martial arts, i.e. combat and self-defense, their spiritual aspects such as meditative practice and healing dimensions are fundamental. The nature and importance of “internal energy” (qi, ki, prana) has been among the many topics,* discussed by serious practitioners. However, the emphasis on the mystical transformation (altering an individual’s customary [what does this word mean here?] experience and self-awareness in the world) associated with the repetitive physical activity through involvement in these meditative-spiritual practices has been missing. Much information concerning the principles and practices of various traditional martial arts was veiled in secrecy, known only in small circles of …show more content…
Drawing parallels with Western scientific epistemology in its understanding of silat as a science, PGB members describe it as founded on natural rather than supernatural principles that can be empirically tested through the universal human body (Samudra 2006: 202). According to Wilson Lee, Martial Arts is a means of cultivating body, a vehicle for spiritual development, a performance art and an international sport. Pencak Silat an indigenous and national martial arts [repetitive], developed conspicuously in Indonesian society and political culture,* as a fighting art and a system of physical and spiritual cultivation. The study and practice of Pencak Silat transforms the body leading to ‘inner knowledge’, or ilmu batin, a spiritual cultivation (Samudra 2006: 217). Many of the practices that come under the rubric of ilmu batin are associated with the Sufi orders, which are closely connected with the spread of Islam in Indonesia (Lee 12). Science, as understood in PGB, is universal and is treated as something nearly tangible. Silat skill can be exchanged, given or taken, kept to oneself or shared, even stolen or destroyed (Samudra 2006: 209). Anyone can in theory achieve this knowledge, so no one is barred from membership in PGB because of his or her ethnic or national heritage (Samudra 2006: 210-212). In an interview with her, Suhu Gunawan talks about his transformation after his own father Suhu Subur died and he became the head of PGB organization. It was not sufficient that he was an experienced Silat teacher or an able manager. He had to prove that he understood the internal workings of the science. He describes going through a liminal period as he undertook to grasp Silat’s most esoteric aspects without a trainer to guide his

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Spirituality Vs Religion

    • 1024 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Instead, yoga is often described as the connection between the body and mind, and the mind and soul. Yoga has been significantly westernised, with a central focus on the physical motions, but in essence it is far more spiritual and experiential. Yoga encourages the soul, increases ones mental health and connects the mind, body and spirit. It is a science that frees the mind from the body’s restraints and carries it toward the soul (Iyengar, 2013, pp. 3, 118,…

    • 1024 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The author of the article provides sufficient evidence to support his claim that there is a current lack of effective training, as well as, a need for the inclusion of spiritual and religious training. Furthermore, information provided regarding the uniqueness of this training as it pertains to the psychology sub disciplines is very helpful in providing the insight needed to understanding the complexities involved in the implementation of spiritual and religious training and what is currently keeping it from being included in each sub discipline. The suggestions included in the final sections regarding the impact the exclusion of spiritual and religious training is having on clients and how training programs can begin to implement this much-needed training are very helpful as well. Since spirituality and religion do effect an individual’s mental health, it is this authors believe that the inclusion of this type of training would be a benefit to both the counselor, as well as the counselee. The fact that most current clinicians support the idea of this importance, but not the inclusion of spiritual and religious training is worrisome and even neglectful on the part of current clinicians not including this…

    • 1284 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In science we are trying to find the meaning of experience outwardly, whereas more emphasis in religion is spiritual experience that foster awareness and understanding of deep religious. In some ways, this may be described by our science, but it cannot be measured and expressed by formulas exact science (Soedowo, 2007). Nevertheless, one thing is clear, that the physical and spiritual life remains dominated by the grammar rule of law. This means, both religion and science, that is, God. Both complement each other and help humans in their respective fields in its own way.…

    • 999 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    These steps never only include deeds but thoughts and keywords. Followers of Hinduism and Buddhism have faith that karma directs the actual method their presence will put on. Contrast & Comparison between Hinduism & Buddhism Ancient history played a role that will be important Hinduism as it was the knowledge sent through the scriptures referred to as Vedas. It absolutely was through these Vedas that individuals learned about karma and started to understand the laws of simple, individual cause-and-effect (Farrer-Halls 9). The view that will be…

    • 1288 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Siddhartha questioned his purpose on earth. Siddhartha knew the answer to this was nowhere near his comfortable reach. Hesse illuminates the fact that mankind has seen so many struggles that overtime his original purpose for living has been lost. Unlike most, Siddhartha looks through these discomforts and finds they are small in comparison to his ultimate question. In the first section, Siddhartha attempts to seek this answer by throwing all of man’s discomforts away, “Instructed by the eldest of the Samanas, Siddhartha practiced self-denial and meditation…” (pg 11).…

    • 797 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Religion has existed since the beginnings of humanity. People have always yearned for a divine being that is both distant and familiar to the common man. While religion stems from the spiritual teachings of a religious leader, it can also be defined merely as an outlet or activity pursued with keenness and dedication. Much like music, art, and dance, which is open to interpretation, religion allows people to escape reality. However, because of the ideas and beliefs that religion entails, it is much less tangible than other outlets and requires a different method of practice.…

    • 963 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Bioethics within the Buddhism parameter are largely stipulated by its ethical codes, which are derived from the concept of karma, eightfold path, four noble truths and the five precepts. These heavily influence the life of adherents and present Buddhism as a dynamic living religion that is incorporated into daily lives. Buddhist ethics are ultimately founded in the natural law of the universe as they centred on the goal of liberating adherents from the constraints of karmic causality to become an enlightened being. The impacts of ethics are considered primarily for the individual as it is grounded on the intentions of a human and not the action itself. This approach is based on the concept of consequentialism, which involves conducting actions, which are virtuous to attain the ultimate enlightenment.…

    • 1207 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Free Will In Islam Essay

    • 949 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Belief in Qadar is essential for Muslims. They must believe that everything that happens to us in this dunya is because Allah because he is in control and knows about the future. Therefore both good and bad things. Muslims have a believe that everything that happens to them in their lives and in this world is under Allah’s control since Allah is all powerful and he can do whatever he needs. Similarly Allah has given all mankind a free will, which means that mankind have free to choose whether to act in an evil way or a good way.…

    • 949 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    It suggests that people cannot simply look to themselves or the therapist for the answer, but actually have to find it in the reality outside of them, and it is their responsibility to do so. In other words, meaning is not given but needs to be discovered. https://meaningtherapy.wordpress.com/2011/05/15/unique-aspects-of-logotherapy/ Criticisms of the humanistic approach: ?? The humanistic approach has been used in few psychological domains and thus its influence is restricted to areas such as therapy, motivation and personality. This may be due to a lack of empirical evidence to support its main theories, as the humanistic approach is non-scientific.…

    • 1050 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    So Mote It Be Analysis

    • 860 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Crowley claimed the term was an ancient and magical phrase, which was more than likely a misconception or Crowley’s need to take ownership of the term. He too, likely borrowed the phrase from the Masons. If an individual is going to close a spell or ritual, their due diligence should include confirming the intent of what is desired. It is vital to understand why you are saying “so mote it be” versus simply just parroting it. Simply saying it because it is written down is redundant, and means nothing to the practitioner, which simply reduces the effectiveness of the spell or ritual.…

    • 860 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays