Criminal Justice Research Paper

Improved Essays
In 1776, the United States became a nation of independence and truth and though that truth stood on what the forefathers built this great country on, the U.S. has been lacking some things that need to not exist into today’s society. America’s social status has not change on how the nation deals with the legalizing of the law and how to properly execute righteous judgment. It seems as though that more and more each day, the United States is locking up people with not enough substantial evidence or even a fair trial. The judicial system and legislative system was to help keep dishonorable people in jail who break the law, not those who are first time offenders to petty crimes. For this to come to an end, righteous and honorable men and women …show more content…
If the United States is to continue these ways of handling cases wrongfully because of the individual or group social status, then the United States judicial system is wrong and needs to be corrected.
In a recent article on judicial integrity, (Bloom, 1993) Justice Rehnquist has said in cases,
“in which the conduct of law enforcement agents is so outrageous that due process principles would absolutely bar the government from invoking judicial process to obtain a conviction” (p.
462). To go this far to get one’s job done faster is abusive and not truth. Whatever happen to
“innocent until proven guilty” phrase, or was it just a phrase and not a written document to protect the people of the United States. The way the government has been handling cases this far has led to many concerns on the authority that is given to judges in their final decision
…show more content…
The man in that case did not show how the court was inconsistence on paper, ensuring that he could not prove neither discrimination on an employment application and not even a corrupt judicial system. Thus, this particular case was thrown out and the court system was not seen as the bad guy in this court case. People of this state continue to see how the judicial system keeps this doctrine in place with not just bankruptcy proceedings, but in any case that tries to deter the courts.
On the other hand, immigrants do not get a fair trial in the judicial system. Lawmakers are trying to change that, but ever since the September 11th attack, the United States has just been on a high level of alertness (McNeil, 2005). Did the country pull together in a time of pain and terrible sorrow? That answer is yes, but what about how everyone that is not fully American or a citizen are getting a high level of no chance in the courtroom. The nation up the legislative power to legalize security and how we allow one to get citizenship, yet alone even come and visit our country. Those who have come over here to live did not know how the nation operate at a time when terrorist attacked us, but they were jailed and arrested for petty crimes for stealing food

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