The Importance Of The UN Charter

1643 Words 7 Pages
While the United Nations is still accused of being a Western institution, it operates as the heart of the global legal regime and is in charge of maintaining stability among nations. Having developed significantly since its creation in 1945, the UN not only focuses on the rights and duties of states but also is increasingly attentive in sustaining the rights of individuals of those states. By enhancing the scope of the United Nations, it’s important to ask whether the longstanding structure is able to effectively pursue global governance, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations. Attempting to create lasting legal guidelines in an anarchical system of sovereign states has proved challenging, as I will argue that under the current …show more content…
Essentially, the idea of the UN Charter was to design the architecture of a new world order, based on the solidarity by the United Nations in the effort to combat a common enemy. The principles of the charter can be considered rules of action, whereas the purposes are the aims of action in order to achieve a certain value. In a nutshell, the Charter includes; the commitments to the maintenance of international peace and security, the development of relations between nations grounded on respect, in accordance with the principle of equal rights, and self-determination of peoples, and the realization of international collaboration in resolving international problems of economic, social, cultural or humanitarian nature, along with the advancement and support of human rights and fundamental freedoms for all (Spijkers, p. 365). The substantive amount of aspiring qualities in the Charter is ultimately what binds nations together in the UN, as under the Charter, all nations are seen as equal despite what the political context might otherwise …show more content…
There is also one more institution called the Trusteeship Council, which is currently not operational but was previously entrusted with preparing territories for independence or self-government. The UN system also encompasses a number of programs and institutional subsidiary bodies that carry on various aspects of the UN’s work. Furthermore, the UN also includes a number of specialized agencies, which are independent bodies with their own charters, budgets, and staff. Notable agencies include IMF, World Bank, International Telecommunications Union, and the International Labour Union. The dizzying array of institutions can be seen as a negative because there is no way an entity can oversee that they are all operating righteously. Basically, there is room for political bargaining that can allow for things to be done partially since countries belongs to regional clusters that lobby to guarantee that they are well represented, and in some cases become over-represented as a result of their more influential bargaining

Related Documents