Spanish Language In Latin America

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Spanish, one of the most widely used languages in the world, continues to gain competence across nations through academic curricula, entertainment for all ages, and even the functionality of the World’s largest corporations. While the Hispanic culture continues to cultivate within American society, the Spanish speaking community has become more prevalent in culture assimilated areas. According to the Pew Research Center, the number of Spanish speakers has flourished as a reflection of the rapid immigration from Latin America. America’s population consists of more than 17% of Hispanics (Census Bureau). As America becomes more diverse, civilians are destined to encounter someone who speaks Spanish at any moment. A general secretary for the Association …show more content…
In today’s expanding industries the Spanish language has grown in recognition through an assortment of mediums. References, indirect or direct, to Spanish prolong via television, music, and even technological accessibility. Since the presence of Spanish speaking residents has developed more profoundly, it has forced business to adapt to the language barriers that exist. Companies have focused on including the romantic language within commercials, and even slogans (Sharp). For example, the most recognizable reference to the language can be seen within the American chain, Taco Bell. Sharp emphasizes that Taco Bell uses the lingo of the Spanish language to match promote their brand; “Yo Quiero Taco Bell!” To become more marketable and suitable, countless establishments have made information on products, machines, and even resources translatable into Spanish upon …show more content…
By inviting the various cultures and languages to enter into our country we encourage the act of assimilation. Since Spanish finds more ways to dominate vocabulary of natives, it is important to monitor and analyze its growth. With this growth are opportunity and challenge; however, many Americans have fallen short from equity because they aren’t up for the challenge. Researching the future of the Spanish language will shine light on the many opportunities that will be prevalent if Americans rise along with the challenges of learning the Spanish

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