The Importance Of The Siege Of Constantinople

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The Siege of Constantinople in 1453 represented the fall of a great empire and the expansion of a new one. This month long battle pitted the invading Ottoman Empire against the long standing Byzantium Empire that had held the city since its construction in the 4th century. This battle had enormous repercussions throughout the historical world and marked the beginning of the Ottoman Empire and the spread of the Islamic religion into Europe. Constantinople represented the capital of the Byzantium Empire and the central gathering place of Orthodox Christians; however, the Byzantium Empire separated itself from the Roman Empire in which supported the Roman Catholic Church. This action is a pivotal factor in the Siege of Constantinople …show more content…
Constantine first used the land and sea to his advantage when he ordered the building of Constantinople in 330. This city was surrounded by water on the north, east and south sides, which enabled defenders to primarily focus on the west walls for defense from land armies. Constantine XI, the man in charge of the defense of the city, constructed a defensive chain at the mouth of the Golden Horn, which prevented enemy ships from reaching the northern walls of the city. The walls of Theodosius stood on the western front and had never been breached by land armies since its construction. These walls stretched from the Sea of Marmara north to the Golden Horn (a distance of six kilometers) and were composed of limestone that was six meters thick. A new and innovative method that had never been used in history would have to be used in order to breach the city of Constantinople. The siege of Constantinople represents the first use of artillery as a crucial point on the battlefield. Mehmed II, the sultan of the Ottoman Empire in 1453, wanted Constantinople to be the new capital of his growing kingdom. This city would be the focal point of future Ottoman rulers, and would allow eastern influences to extend into the Balkans and Western Europe. Mehmed II was determined to conquer this …show more content…
The first decision involved his naval fleet. A massive chain blocked the Golden Horn to the north from invading ships. Mehmed bypassed the chain by hauling part of his fleet across a narrow stretch of land that was north of the inlet. This decision forced the defenders to spread out along both the northern and western walls of the city, thinning their ranks and making it easier for the Ottoman army to attack the walls. Mehmed also made the decision to aim all of his cannons, including his massive Basilica at one section of the wall. Within a day the walls began to

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