The Importance Of The Secularization Of Education

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When discussing any major decision on the topic of education, we must ask: what do we want to accomplish with public education? And the fact that this policy needs to be applied to an American society means that the purpose must be in sync with American ideals to be successful in the long term. It must uphold a citizen’s natural rights for instance, pursue public safety, grant individual autonomy, and be a sacrifice for the good of the many. Through these four goals, it becomes clear that any beneficial system of education needs to be solely run for the greatest good, the American people, and that any system that is exclusively centered on the welfare of the people is the correct avenue toward creating “a more perfect union.” But our current …show more content…
It was under this pretext that the system of education was put in the hands of government, not because of a preeminent lack of literacy nor that the quality of education at the time was sub par, but solely because of a drastic ideological …show more content…
In the U.S. Constitution, education is not mentioned, and in the past, the duty of educating people was left to parents and religious denominations. No school attendance laws nor any federal control over the material existed. And still, this lack of a system manufactured a rather literate society that could read everything that was published -- the rate of literacy of adults worldwide around 1870 was estimated by UNESCO to be over 80% and was no striking problem. So why did education become so structured? Why did the state start taking control of student learning? The answer is simple. The mandatory system of public education is not intended to benefit the community as a whole, nor needed to create informed voters; rather, public education is used to advance the narratives of governing bodies, to be a mode of indoctrination to bend students into followers. And this indoctrination is clearly seen in the secularization of education. As previously mentioned, basic learning was first at the hands of religious institutions. But when the ideas of science and religion started to clash, those at the top of the academic hierarchy strived for the advancement of scientific thought. Moreover,

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