American Technological Sublime Analysis

Superior Essays
One can only imagine the awe that Harold Thomas Webber, a 25-year-old amateur photographer and railroad enthusiast from the Bronx, felt as he accepted unlimited access to the 1939 World’s Fair due to his volunteer work at the Fair 's railroad pavilion. Henry was only one of the 45 million people who would attend the New York World Fair, making it a massively attended event. From 1939 to 1940 the New York World’s Fair took place on top of a garbage dome in New York spread throughout 1,216 acres.The outcome was not the only impressive attribute of the Fair. A historical theme can be tied to the fair as it was held on the 150th anniversary of George Washington’s inauguration. Although it was represented throughout the fair it didn’t inspire most …show more content…
In fact, David Nye in the Introduction to the American Technological Sublime argues that Americans have been fascinated with the sublime nature of technology. Stating that the dynamic, geometric and electric sublimes are what spark this fascination, one can find that this American craving can be easily connected to the spectacles that Americans found truly sublime. For example, the spectacle of race was extremely apparent in the Colombian Exposition due to the symbolism of the Midway Plaisance and the White Palace. Race was an aspect and attribute of life that many had been closed off to at this time. Similarly, futuristic technology was awe inspiring during the New York World’s Fair in the same way. The inventions of the microwave, a magnets, ”objects suspended in the air,” and a big brain that could answer questions. Not to mention the striking progressive goal the fair offered for Americans and their future. With exhibits such as Futurama, Democracity, Utopian Cities, the Perisphere and the Trylon Americans left with a difficulty to suppress the excitement of what corporations would do next.The most memorable exhibit at the fair was the General Motors Pavilion, and the most memorable feature in the General Motors Pavilion was a ride called the Futurama. People stood in line for hours to ride it and experience the exciting possibilities of life in the …show more content…
We love to root for our team. As a result, the back and forth between the Air Force and the Navy provided a sports emphasise the public fed into. This rivalry permeated the operation. Operation Crossroads now had two purposes, to learn about the effect of nuclear weapons and to unite American defenses. Another goal that possibly could have been to worry more about the native Bikinians. Shown on cameras and broadcasted, were videos and pictures of natives smiling and waving while leaving their land. Another video depicted an American soldier explaining that these tested were for the “benefit of the world.” Did they really accept their fate so joyously? It didn’t matter. Americans yearned for the heros the Bikinians were made out to be. The kindness that the Americans soldiers were showing. It was sublime, the video of the willing natives leaving so the Americans could complete their mission to “benefit the world.” Operation Crossroads was such an alluring topic due to the heavy propaganda, protest and experimental nature it radiated. Newspapers also published much information about the mission, making it accessible to those who didn’t have the new technology, radios. People sat in their homes and drooled at the sound of the booming numbers being counted off through their radios. 5...4...3...2...1. The radio was such a desired device due to the live updates it provided. The radio offered the public

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