The Importance Of The Natural Burial Movement

1247 Words 5 Pages
The average number of deaths per year in the United States is 2,468,435. (http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm) (5) That many people are dying every year, how long until there is no more room to bury people? That is where the Natural Burial Movement comes into play not only solving that problem, but so many more. More land to choose from to be buried, less chemicals and even rebuilding the environment in more than one way. This movement is a solution to something frightening, our own death, but helps create peace by allowing uninhabited bodies to serve a purpose. The Natural Burial Movement not only goes back to the conventional ways of how people were buried in the past, but also has new contemporary ways that help save the environment. One …show more content…
For instance the corps can be wrapped in fine linens and laid to rest, or one can purchase a biodegradable burial vessel. This vessel is made out of natural and recycled materials such as recycled papers and fibers. (1) Another way is to be laid to rest in a wicker casket. Over time wicker decomposes acting as a natural casket. Equally important is an alternative to the normal cremation process is a process called “Bio Cremation”. This is a gentle, eco-friendly alternative to the normal flame based cremation. (6) This process involves water and potassium hydroxide to decompose the body where all that remains is bone ash. (6) The corpse is placed in a pressurized stainless steel chamber where water and alkali solution are added and the temperature is kept at 350 degrees Fahrenheit. (6) Between the water, alkali, heat, and pressure working together circulating the corpse the reaction begins and completes the cremation …show more content…
(1) Not only is all that underground but uncounted amounts of plastic, vinyl, fiberglass, and 1.5 million tons of reinforced concrete. (1) The steel goes into vaults as well as the reinforced concrete. (1) While more steel, copper, brass, and the different types of wood are made into caskets. (1) With this in mind one might think that cremation would be a greener alternative than traditional burial; however, it is not. When a body is cremated toxins are released that contain mercury from teeth fillings and emissions from burning synthetic body implants. (1) Cremation creates a larger carbon footprint than one would think. Although there are increasingly better filtration systems that are made to absorb these toxins, the filters still need to be removed and disposed of.

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