The Importance Of The Movement For The Care Of Children

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According to Samuels (n.d, p.6), the first Kindertransport arrived in Harwich, Britain on 2nd December. From then onwards, the Movement for the Care of Children facilitated the safe arrival of two transports each week, until July when arrivals were increased to daily. The last train ferrying children from Germany departed on 1st September, 1939, just two days before the eruption of the Second World War. Saamuels (n.d, p.6) establishes that at least 10, 000 children of whom at least 7, 000 were of Jewish origin were evacuated from Nazi controlled areas in Germany, Austria, and Czechoslovakia. However, despite this fact, a further unknown number were thought to have been caught up in the German invasion of the Netherlands and Belgium, as the …show more content…
It is of importance to mention that the British government elected to intern at least 1, 000 of the rescued children as enemy aliens in makeshift internment camps. A further 400 children were sent to either Australia or Canada. According to USHMM (2014), there have been reports that some of the children were mishandled and mistreated en route to Australia. However, over and above, after the end of the war, a significant portion of the Kindertransport children became British Citizens or emigrated to either Canada, the US, Australia, or …show more content…
It not only reflects public goodwill, but a unification of the human race against a designated tormentor. In the face of open brutality, fellow human beings found space to conduct a lasting act of mercy. Morality in this regard is represented by the Divine Command Theory, which decrees that an act is only considered good or bad subject to God’s sanction. From a religious perspective, God forbids murder, persecution, and acts of dehumanization. In contrast, he encourages kindness and brotherliness, which are some of the oral qualities that were displayed by the organizers of the Kindertransport. In essence, the mission to rescue children threatened by Nazis was forunded on the premise of the sanctity of life and the need to protect the less advantaged in the

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