The Importance Of The Lesbian Rights Project

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When reminiscing on her childhood, Jenny Rain could recall the injustices and skepticism that her family would face on a day-to-day basis. Jenny remembers overhearing hurtful slurs that were directed towards her and her family during one of their visits to the Virginia Beach boardwalk. The remarks that Jenny overheard people say ignited a fire in her, whereas her two dads were oblivious to the snide comments. Later in life, Jenny came to the realization that the fate of same-sex couples to be able to legally marry and parent children rested on the shoulders of those in her generation that experienced the same upbringing by gay parents as she did. In the fight for marriage equality, children like Jenny account for a huge part of the debate to …show more content…
In 1974 a similar ruling occurred, but this time it involved a New Jersey superior court judge’s ruling that the sexual orientation of a father is not a valid reason to deny him child visitation. This in turn marked the first time that a court in the United States acknowledged the constitutional rights of gay fathers (Rudolph). In 1976 it was decided that judges’ custody decisions were no longer to be determined based solely on a parent’s sexual orientation. The Lesbian Rights Project, otherwise known as LRP, formed in San Francisco by lawyers Donna Hitchens and Roberta Achtenberg in 1977. The Lesbian Rights Project evolved over time into the National Center for Lesbian Rights (Rudolph). The National Center for Lesbian Rights continues to help lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender parents (as well as many others) today. In a custody case in 1978, the Washington Supreme Court issued the first ruling in favor of a lesbian couple. Also in 1978, the first state to begin to accept adoption applications from LGBT parents, without disregarding them simply because of the parents’ homosexuality, was New York (Rudolph). The first known gay couple in the country to …show more content…
On September 28, 2009, President Barack Obama became the first president to specifically mention same-sex parents in a presidential proclamation on Family Day. President Obama stated, “Whether children are raised by two parents, a single parent, grandparents, a same-sex couple, or a guardian, families encourage us to do our best and enable us to accomplish great things.” The following year in 2010 President Obama voted to revise hospital rules so that they would allow the patients to choose their visitors (Rudolph). Hospital patients could now include same-sex partners, which were previously not recognized as family members by hospitals, to their approved visitation list. In 2011 the traditional passport application’s section where one would fill out the name of his or her guardians was changed from “Mother” and “Father” to the more appropriate terms “Mother or Parent 1” and “Father or Parent 2” (Rudolph). In 2015 the Supreme Court declared same-sex marriage legal in all 50 states (Chappell). Throughout history the law has been inconsistent in the rulings that involve a member of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender

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