Conflict In Religion

Great Essays
Although not necessarily so, many aspects of religion make it susceptible to being a latent source of conflict. Along with peace, belonging and power, dilemma, confusion and illogicality are also terms bounded within the subject of religion. As a result, these so called “terms” serve nothing but large and rightfully so, conflicts. All religions have their accepted dogma, doctrines and virtues and they must be followed without a question. The Bhagavad-Gita, for example, is a 700 verse scripture in Sanskrit, which is the foundation of such doctrines in the sect “Jainism”, an ancient Indian religion established in the 6th century BC.
In India religiosity is not taken lightly, in fact it is the fundamental DNA of the country where certain rituals
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The rituals that are performed are only done because each individual has their own belief, as this is their mind-set. What we were really challenging as illogical early wasn’t religion at all, but the beliefs of people that lay behind it, as established in the start of the essay. And so, anything an individual believes in is completely valid no matter how outlandish other might challenge it to be. We created religion, likewise, faith, beliefs and the rituals are also created by us, and therefore there is no reason to challenge religion if it is a system of meaning created by humans and not by God. Nietzsche supports this idea very well when he mentions, “once upon a time, in some out of the way corner of the universe…there was a star upon which clever beasts invented knowing” (P.451). Nietzsche summons this idea that humans were the creatures that invented knowledge and it wasn’t an act indulged by anyone else. Equally, religion is a system of meaning that was invented long back by human, we created it because we thought it was right, because we thought that this was the right way to bring the best of whom we are. Therefore critiquing religion almost seems bizarre and contradictory. Thus, Jainism has given us, Jains, a choice; it is our choice to follow the rituals or to completely avoid it. But by ignoring it doesn’t make us a bad person nor does it invoke sins, in fact, being a good person and being religious are two very different things, you can be one but you don’t have be one to be the other. And quite rightfully the Gita states that rituals are performed and fasts are upheld every year to bring peace and serenity in a persons mind, and if people truly have a strong belief in this, then for them “illogical ” is truly just a

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