Electoral College: True Representative Democracy In The United States

1800 Words 7 Pages
Democracy relies on representative democracy in the ability of the populace to participate in and take part in general elections for the representative leaders of the country. However there are rules in systems in place in a true representative democracy more complicated than it was in the past. Voters today are also faced with a large and increasing number of hot topic issues that require more knowledge than the average voter is likely to know which in turn makes meaningful presence in the election difficult to fully achieve. Campaigns help to ease this massive influx and information and allow the voter the opportunity to know what they’re going to vote for as the political party a politician belongs to indicates their stances on all the …show more content…
The Electoral College utilizes a plurality system to count votes and decide which candidate gets the votes for each state. This presents a problem that even though a candidate may win in the popular vote that may not win the Electoral College as was the case during the 2000 election. When this system prevents the popular vote from being the winner of the election this contrasts in terms of overall majority. The argument that the electoral college hinders true representation is based on the fact that the plurality in each state gets the whole state as far as the ballots go. However the counterargument is that the Electoral College and the first pass the Post System that allow for true representation from each state in the election. This is because each state has a different winner that was chosen by the people of that state or at least the plurality of the people in that state. So it comes down to the Electoral College the true question is does the plurality system allow for better representation? Or does it dilute the votes of the general population? In this instance the plurality system is better than say a full blown majority rules when it comes representing the views of each state independently from the population. Wyoming will have different opinions that New York for example and their voices are necessary in a representative …show more content…
The United States is currently very much divided politically. There’s the liberal left and there’s the conservative right. The partisanship in politics has its uses and its faults. Perhaps the biggest and most blatant benefit to the political party system is that party identification allows voters to know this stance of their candidate on important issues. It is not reasonable or logical to expect detailed information about each candidate on the ballot. Even if it was on the ballot it would not be reasonable to expect or soon that the general population will read each candidate’s individual stance on certain political issues. Therefore the party identification tag allows voters to easily identify where each candidate stands on everything. This gives the voters the ability to accurately vote for who they want to based on what their known political stances are and is the benefit of the political parties. This also allows smaller and lesser known candidates in smaller and more insignificant races the opportunity to ride the wave of any party any given time depending on social factors and national factors that can favor one party over the other Campaigns and important part of elections and in many elections the campaigning began some long before the voting actually

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