Separation Of Powers Of The Constitution Essay

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The Constitution is a living document that holds the basic set-up for the United States’ government and the laws by which citizens should abide. One of the main elements of the Constitution are its focus on the powers to limit the three branches’ powers. Specifically, the legislative branch’s limits are expanded upon greater than the judicial or executive branch. Another element that has grown from the Constitution is the expansion of presidential power due to special circumstances. The other branches have also had to accommodate for the expansion of power by enforcing checks and balances. Another main focus of the Constitution has been the foundations of America that are rooted in federalism. Federalism serves to limit the national government’s powers and extend ways for citizens to get involved. The Constitution’s fundamental principles and values have affected the process of checks and balances and federalism; which all have shaped America’s institutions and practices.

The powers and limits of the
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In parliamentary government, the executive and legislative branches had a very close tie. When a party in parliament “wins,” its leader becomes the prime minister, and the chief executive and chief legislative officer. The members of Parliament hold all cabinet-level positions. Between these two things, it creates a unified government that can legislate and execute policy. This type of different powers together is prohibited in the United States. This means that any member of congress can not occupy another office in the federal government. In Parliament, the House of Commons decides nearly everything about the government. In the United States, the House of Representatives and the Senate are equally as powerful and are constantly checking and limiting each other. Everyone in the Senate and House of Representatives are elected and can only stay in office a certain amount of

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