The Importance Of The Cell Cycle

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The cell cycle is vital process cells go through in order to grow and divide. The cell cycle consists of two main stages, interphase and mitotic phase. During interphase, it is important for the cells to obtain nutrients needed to grow and produce copies of DNA. There are three phases of interphase, G1 (G= Gap), S (S= Synthesis), and G2 (G= Gap). Mitotic phase consists of two major events in the cycle, one being when the cell splits in two, a procedure called cytokinesis, and another other is when the nucleus divides, a procedure called mitosis. Certain genes can alter the cell cycle process. The three genes observed during the experiment each have an evident effect of the cell cycle. Checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) is essential in cell cycle regulation, …show more content…
In the 1800’s, scientist Theodor Schwann and Matthias Schleidan founded the cell theory which states that all living things are made of one or more cells, cells are the basic unit of life, and that all cells result from from pre-existing cells. In order for cells to grow and divide, they must go through the process of the cell cycle. The cell cycle is a set of events that leads to the division into two daughter cells and cell growth. The stages of the cell cycle are separated into two main phases, interphase and mitotic phase. During interphase, the cell obtains nutrients that help the cell grow and produce copies of its DNA. Interphase can be broken down into three stages: G1, S, and G2. During G1 phase, the cell grows and produces proteins that are used in DNA replication. In S phase, the DNA is synthesized. During G2 phase, DNA synthesis ends and the cells continue to grow and produce proteins. Mitotic phase begins when G2 phase ends. The two major events that occur in the cycle are when the cell splits in two, a procedure called cytokinesis, and when the nucleus divides, a procedure called mitosis. To ensure that the cells replicate their DNA and divide properly, eukaryotic cells have a network of regulatory proteins that guarantees the events of the cell cycle occur in sequence and that each process is completed before the next one begins. Three checkpoints that control development through the cell …show more content…
cerevisiae, more commonly known as yeast, have had a remarkable impact in science. Belonging to the Kingdom, Fungi, making is a unicellular, eukaryotic decomposer and the Phylum, Ascomycota, which includes the presence of a reproductive mechanism called the ascus, S. cerevisiae have been the model system for molecular genetic research because of their basic cellular mechanism of replication, recombination, cell division, and metabolism are generally conserved between yeast and eukaryotes. The sequence of its genome has resemblance to the sequences of human and other eukaryotic genes. The simplicity of genetic manipulation of yeast allows it to be used for analyzing and dissection gene products from other eukaryotes. Yeast is effective to use in the laboratory due to its quick rate of reproduction. Compared to many other fungal organisms, S. cerevisiae cells can reproduce both sexually and asexually. When of S. cerevisiae undergo sexual reproduction the cells are called sporulation, and under asexual reproduction the cells are called budding. S. cerevisiae exists as either a haploid or a diploid cell. The cells can reproduce by mitosis where daughter cells grow off from the mother cells. During this process, the nucleus of the parent cell breakups and connects with the daughter cell. Diploid cells can undergo meiosis to produce four haploid cells that are composed of two a spores and two α spores upon stressful environments, such as nutrient depletion. Haploid cells can

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