Charter Of Rights

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The Charter of Rights and Freedoms, created by late Prime Minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau in 1982, has strongly benefited Canada in a number of favourable ways. Prior to this Charter, Canada had a Bill of Rights. This Bill was inadequate since it did not apply to any of the provinces and it did little for the Federal Government on a constitutional bases. Due to the inadequacies of this Bill, it was confirmed that more effective constitutional framework needed to be adopted. As a result, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms was created as a part of the Canadian constitution in 1982. This essay will demonstrate that the Charter of Rights has provided Canada with various safeguards to protect rights and civil liberties of its citizens. The …show more content…
Civil liberties are categorized into four groups: political civil liberties, legal civil liberties, egalitarian civil liberties, and economic civil liberties. Political civil liberties, also known as the fundamental freedoms, comprises of many freedoms which include: freedom of conscience and religion, freedom of speech, freedom of peaceful assembly, and freedom of association. Democracy is a major part of Canada, and through civil liberty, Canadian citizens will always be a part of it. Legal civil liberties, also known as fundamental justice, are for any citizen who breaks the law. Some of these liberties include: prohibition of arbitrary arrest, and the right of habeas corpus-bail or presumption of innocence. This is beneficial for any citizen who has been falsely accused or gone through injustice. Egalitarian civil liberties refers to equality rights as it makes sure that no citizen is discriminated against. This liberty is beneficial for all Canadians as they all are treated equally and no individual is better than another. Finally, the economic civil liberties refers to the ability of citizens of the country to prosper without the governments or any economic authority’s intervention. This is beneficial for citizens working as entrepreneurs, for example. The civil liberties are highly beneficial to …show more content…
This essay focusses on three areas of the charter including: justice, equality and civil liberties. All these rights and liberties are strengthened by the Charter. In short, the Charter is a safeguard for democracy and it allows the people of Canada to uphold their rights and liberties. The Charter allows our democracy to exist, and a strong and vibrant democracy benefits Canada. In the word of late Prime Minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau, “We must establish the basic principles, the basic values and beliefs which hold us together as Canadians so that beyond our regional loyalties there is a way of life and a system of values which make us proud of the country that has given us such freedom and such immeasurable

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