The Importance Of The American Dream In Fences By August Wilson

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“For the immigrants of Europe, a dream dared and won true. The descendants of African slaves were offered no such welcome or participation.” (Wilson, xvii) The play Fences, written by August Wilson, presents inequality African Americans still suffer from 1950s to 1960s even after slavery, before the Civil Rights Movement. Whether American Dream is the unreachable star or the apple which can be reached on tiptoe; August Wilson, implying that the American Dream is the sense of achievement and security people are thirst for rather than specific jobs or lifestyles, emphasizes that various races, generations and genders do not have equal opportunities to achieve American Dream, and protests the inequality through encouraging African Americans to …show more content…
Troy holds his sons back based on his failure of achieving a respected life. He prevents Cory forming his own dream. Cory, Troy’s second son, has desire to attend the football team because of his thirst of having a chance to shape himself. Troy was like a shadow to Cory, and Cory does not know who himself truly is. Even though people have opinions that Wilson wants to demonstrate “the next generation wants to be better than the previous one” idea through presenting conflicts Troy and Cory have, but Wilson actually wants to show Cory as a lost boy who wants to be a grown-up. In the conversation Cory has with Rose before Troy’s funeral, Cory said Troy was everywhere as a shadow, and Cory hustles because joining football team and go to college is a chance to pave his own road instead of obeying his father’s words, but Cory does not have intention from the beginning to fight for a better life than his dad has. Cory is still in the stage of exploring who he really is, but if Troy gives him space to do what he wants to do when Cory was young, Cory will have a bigger and clearer dream. As for Lyons, music makes him safe and inspired, but Troy’s negative attitude was not helpful on his way of being an outstanding musician. However, Troy’s interference is a result from discrimination he suffered when he was young, and Wilson emphasizes the seriousness of negative effects discrimination …show more content…
Wilson depicts Rose as a typical African American woman in the 1950s and 1960s. After Troy tells Rose that he was going to a father, Rose said that “Don’t you think I had dreams and hopes? What about my life? What about me.” (Wilson, 70) However, she still decides to raise Raynell and turned her focus from Troy to religion and motherhood. Rose decides to think for herself after Troy’s cheating. Wilson uses the turn of Rose’s attitude to encourage African American women to have their own dreams as individuals instead of regarding themselves as someone’s wife and merely a part of a

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