The Importance Of Teaching Practises For Indigenous Diversity

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Teachers have a responsibility to their students to foster safe learning environments that motivate and challenge students to meet their potential. (AITSL, 2012) When examining teaching practises for indigenous diversity this goal must be the focus of planning and facilitating. Within every classroom world-wide teacher’s work to address diversities and provide equal opportunity to all students, “teachers must recognise and vale each student’s unique interests, experiences and abilities, needs and backgrounds.” (Moffat, 2010, p. 252) Since The first Commonwealth-State National Aboriginal Education Policy in 1989 the education sector has been working to promote equality between indigenous students and non-indigenous students learning standards. …show more content…
Stage 4 outcome 8D requires students to “identify, consider and appreciate cultural expression in texts” while stage 5 students build on this outcome requiring students to “question, challenge and evaluate cultural assumptions in texts and their effects on meaning”. (BOSTES, 2009) Stage 6 curriculum takes the cultural examination further still allowing students to “enhance their understanding of Australian and other cultures” (BOSTES, 2009) through examining representations, languages and interpretations of texts. When studying culture within literature it is important to examine a wide scope of cultures; Australia is largely a multicultural society with waves of immigration beginning with the first inhabitants the Aboriginal people. Including these cultures within the classroom allows for students to draw significance between their own experiences, identifies and histories and the classroom studies (NSW Department of Education, 2003) Including text about indigenous culture is only the first step into achieving equality within the classroom and dismissing the traditional western learning that was practised for many years. Through the inclusion of indigenous literature within the English curriculum indigenous learning is fostered while non-indigenous learning is extended; within stage 4 students are required to study the unit The …show more content…
However current statistics suggest that teachers do not feel comfortable with their understanding of indigenous cultures “More than 25% of surveyed Australian teachers feel that they need more professional development for Aboriginal education” and education programs for teachers are not readily applied “More than half the teachers of schools with more than 10% Aboriginal students said they had no professional development in schooling them during the past 3 years. Only 23.9% had more than one day of training.” (Korff, Barriers to Aboriginal Education, 2012) This discrepancy has resulted in studies, programs and resource development for teachers and students. In early 2005 the resource Sharing Culture was developed as a way to provide curriculum based educational programs and resources for indigenous communities and Australian schools. (Sharing Culture, 2014) In 2008 the department of education NSW implemented the Aboriginal Education and Training Policy to establish the requirement for classroom learning and teacher training; the policy was created in collaboration with indigenous communities to address their personal desires for progressing classroom learning. (Department of Education NSW, 2015) The Policy and Shared Culture provide a theoretical base for teachers while programs and centres such as Redfern’s National Centre of Indigenous

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