Reasonable Opinion In The Police Force

842 Words 4 Pages
Reasonable suspicion protects the suspects, while it allows the police to do their job the right way. In orders to balance the power of the police with the rights of suspect, PACE was introduce as guideline. Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 states that the police can search an individual at a “place to which at the time when he proposes to exercise the power the public or any section of the public has access, on payment or otherwise, as of right or by virtue of express or implied permission”. However, reasonable grounds for suspicions depend on the conditions of each case at the time of the search. Police officers have high level of authority over the public, which gives them the right to stop and search any individual. Nevertheless, …show more content…
The police use this method to deter weapons, drugs and stolen properties, which in return make communities safer. The Met commissioner, Sir Hogan-Howe revealed how crime in London had dropped by 30% overall. For example Newham figure shows reduction on crime 5,871 to 3,804 and knife crime injuries up from 57 to 66. This changes are dues to the stop and search in the police force. Although, it has been pointed out that “knife crime is at its lowest in seven year” Theresa May believe that it is unfair, and wastes valuable police time time carrying out unnecessary stop and search. Thus, she says, the police could put their time in a better use by focusing on working with gangs and creating enhanced relationship with the …show more content…
Example such as this is what encourages the public to have bad perception of the police. If a search takes place, the police should have reasonable grounds, which may lead to an arrest. If this will lead to an arrest, each stage should be carried out with a view towards authoritative legal resolution, whether that is to be done through a warning, caution, plea or trial. This case of Dryburgh v. Galt 1981 J.C. 69, 72 illustrated how inconsiderable the police as they did not think through the process as it was questionable to whether the police officer had reasonable cause to “suspect that the appellant had alcohol in his body while he was

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