The Importance Of Society In The Great Gatsby

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It is the common consensus is that people wear mask as tool to improve their chances of success. Societal achievements are often attached to and measured by displays of opulence, which in turns becomes signifiers of status to the public at large. These signifiers become the litmus by which others come to judge success. It can be something as large as new house or car or as insidious and implicit as the right shade of skin, each becoming more attached to the idea of success and wide scale acceptance in the larger public consciousness. Since, human beings are communal based animals by nature, societal perception is often vital in determining who is successful and who is not, thus making masks a useful tool to achieving success based on the society …show more content…
In these books, other character’s that inhabit a world that is idolized and most importantly, inaccessible by the protagonist defines the society in their minds. Their desire to be close to these people encourages them to construct masks to try to access to the aforementioned world that would allow them to be on equal footing with the people they Idolize. In the Great Gatsby, this need to belong left Gatsby, Myrtle Wilson, and George Wilson, “broken up like glass against Tom’s hard malice” (Fitzgerald 155). They were willing to fake it until they were either accepted or died trying. Without a doubt, the novel, Passing, the author Haizlip explained how her family abandoned mother and home in the 1800-1900 to move out of poverty. They made a choice to deny their heritage by passing for white in …show more content…
His failed courtship created a belief in his mind that his true identity was not good enough to be with the woman of his dreams. The need to win Daisy stimulated his decision to construct a mask that would give faster access to wealth and social status. He believed it would to give equal footing with the one he adores. In his quest to appear on Daisy and Tom’s level, He surrounded himself with the trappings of wealth, like a mansion that held an extensive library that an intoxicated guest considered a triumph and thoroughness kept real. He threw gigantic parties, which went all night Filled with “chatter and laughter, and casual innuendo and introductions forgotten on the spot, and enthusiastic meetings between women who never knew each other 's

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